Category Archives: Papers on Büchner’s “Leonce and Lena” (first version)

Star-Crossed Lovers: Fate in Buchner’s Leonce and Lena

A bizarre fiction of power and obedience; a ludicrous tale of politics and love. Georg Buchner’s Leonce and Lena depicts a tale of two royals, determined to flee the futures that have been laid out for them by their handlers, … Continue reading

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Pipi, Popo and Other Kingdoms of Disillusionment; Nobility in Büchner’s Leonce and Lena

Flashing cameras, private jets and international events – just snapshots of the glamorous lives of today’s wealthy politicians and movie stars. Everyone envies the leisurely lifestyle of the rich until that leisure becomes destructive. When a cloud of disillusionment shrouds … Continue reading

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Forfeiture of Free Will: Büchner’s “Leonce and Lena”

Is free will a figment of the imagination or a gift that can be squandered if precautions are not taken?  In Büchner’s “Leonce and Lena,” King Peter arranges for his son, Prince Leonce, to marry Princess Lena.  Leonce and Lena … Continue reading

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First Version: Papers on Büchner’s “Leonce and Lena” – Peer-editing!

Now that your rough drafts are posted on the blog, please peer-edit one of them (i.e. one that has not been peer-edited yet). You should offer some helpful advice or ask a question that might lead the writer to develop … Continue reading

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Hypocritical Automata in Büchner’s Leonce and Lena

In many of his writings, Georg Büchner criticizes and mocks the ruling power of his time, the royal German gentry. His treatise “Der Hessiche Landbote,” for instance, denounces the authoritative state of the Grand Duchy of Hessen, examining its inherently … Continue reading

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Escaping Fate is Futile: Georg Büchner’s Leonce and Lena

In Georg Büchner’s play, Leonce and Lena, the protagonists, Leonce and Lena, face situations that seem both improbable and coincidental. In particular, both Leonce and Lena make the mutual decision to abandon their duties as noble-people and try to escape … Continue reading

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Star-Crossed Lovers: Fate in Buchner’s Leonce and Lena

A bizarre fiction of power and obedience; a ludicrous tale of politics and love. Georg Buchner’s Leonce and Lena depicts a tale of two royals, determined to flee the futures that have been laid out for them by their handlers, … Continue reading

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The Socially Constructed Prison: Repetition in Büchner’s “Leonce and Lena”

Art has long been a means to present a social commentary to the masses, and Büchner’s masterpiece “Leonce and Lena” seamlessly melds very important social issues into a comedic story. Büchner’s focus is to critique the monarchy through Leonce, a dramatic … Continue reading

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Valerio’s Forfeiture of Free Will in Büchner’s “Leonce and Lena”

Is free will a figment of the imagination or a gift that can be squandered if precautions are not taken?  In Büchner’s “Leonce and Lena,” King Peter arranges for his son, Prince Leonce, to marry Princess Lena.  The Leonce and … Continue reading

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A Bleak Paradise: Georg Büchner’s “Leonce and Lena”

Impoverished peasants without a voice, an increasingly socially, politically, and economically oppressed working class, wealthy nobility garbed in fine silks and satins perched high in their castles; such was the societal landscape of Germany in the years 1815 to 1848. … Continue reading

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