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A Vocabulary of Inclusion

EMBRACING INTERSECTIONALITY

Kenya Wright, ’18, College of Arts and Science, VUcept Executive Board I am a Black Hispanic. That is who I am, who I’ve always been, and who I’ll always be. My culture is a mixture infused with Latino and Caribbean elements. Growing up, my home was filled with a tangle of accents and languages, an…

Posted by on March 29, 2017 in A Vocabulary of Inclusion, ,


International Student reception and dinner at Commons Center.(John Russell/Vanderbilt University)

ACCEPTANCE

Farishtay Yamin, ’17, School of Engineering I tolerate a fly buzzing around a room. I tolerate an electricity outage. Maybe I complain, but I’ve learned to become patient. The fly irritates me, but I have to deal with it. It’s a fact of life. My freshman year I prayed somewhere in the stacks of Peabody…

Posted by on March 29, 2017 in A Vocabulary of Inclusion, ,


TOKENISM

Lauren Pak, ’17, Peabody College As the daughter of first generation immigrants, coming from a high school where over half the students spoke a language other than English at home, my transition to a rather homogenous college campus where my ethnic immigrant experience was in the minority, was often difficult. During a discussion section in…

Posted by on March 29, 2017 in A Vocabulary of Inclusion, ,


MICROAGGRESSIONS

Laurel Hattix, ’16, Peabody College “It must be nice knowing that even though you aren’t really black, you always have affirmative action to get you where you want to go.” Welcome to my first week at Vanderbilt. I was bombarded with countless “So, what are you?” questions, several unwelcomed hands pulling at my hair, and…

Posted by on March 29, 2017 in A Vocabulary of Inclusion, ,


Various views of Engineering building with detail shots. (John Russell/Vanderbilt University)

PRIVILEGE

Nick Sparkman, ’17, School of Engineering “So… what are you?” This question, asked by a white student, was posed to a person in my house who identifies as biracial. I watched my friend hesitantly fielding the question. I cannot truly understand what he felt as he was (under social pressure) forced to explain his racial…

Posted by on March 29, 2017 in A Vocabulary of Inclusion, ,