Monthly Archives: June 2012

Bernhard Siegfried Albinus and Brian Jacques

In the following blog post, Killian C. Quigley discusses Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison’s Objectivity in conjunction with personal and societal perceptions of “nature.” The author gives a anecdotal story about how the books he read as a child influenced his contemporary view on nature, and relates it to Daston and Galison’s theories of “truth-to-nature,” […] Continue reading

Posted in 18th century, animals, Bernhard Siegfried Albinus, Bleak House, Brian Jacques, Charles Dickens, constructions of nature, Emer de Vattel, Fantasy, image, J.R.R. Tolkien, Kenneth Grahame, Law of Nations, Lorraine Daston, natural history, natural world, naturalist, nature, objectivity, Omaha, painting, Peter Galison, Redwall, Robin Jarvis, Run Wild, Science and humanities, scientific sight, The Deptford Histories, The Lord of the Rings, The Wind in the Willows, Tom McCaughren, zoo, Zoobooks | Comments Off on Bernhard Siegfried Albinus and Brian Jacques

Academic Flirting: Writing Conference Abstracts

Like most of us, you’re likely hoping to get a job one day, and to that end have been urged by your faculty to present your research at a conference. Presenting is a great way to demonstrate your competence in … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Professionalization | Comments Off on Academic Flirting: Writing Conference Abstracts

The Perfect Type

What is “perfect?” You can cite dictionary definitions, but in the end those are essentially impossible ideals to obtain. “Perfection” as we know it is almost a purely theoretical concept, used mostly as emphasis. But Dan Fang discusses perfection in the context of scientific endeavour; what is considered a “perfect” organism, so that it is […] Continue reading

Posted in archetype, Brave New World, dystopia, Eugenics, Lorraine Daston, objectivity, perfection, Peter Galison, repetition, subjectivity, type | Comments Off on The Perfect Type

How People Do Science

Erin Pellarin, in response to Dan King’s post, further examines the idea of humans becoming things, but this time in a historical scientific context. Rather than focusing on the future world imagined in Brave New World, she instead looks to examples in our past and details how people have already been objectified in the name […] Continue reading

Posted in Ethics of science, future relations, human interaction in science, humans as things/machines, Lorraine Daston, objectivity, Peter Galison, science, truth-to-nature | Comments Off on How People Do Science

Wild Bioassumptions?

In the following article, Killian C Quigley considers the power, potential, and responsibilities that come with the increase of bioscience knowledge. By comparing Huxley’s Brave New World to Nikolas Rose’s The Politics of Life Itself: Biomedicine, Power, and Subjectivity in the Twenty-First Century to Frank Bruni’s Genetic or Not, Gay Won’t Go Away, Quigley offers […] Continue reading

Posted in bioethics, biological determinism, biomedicine, bioscience, Brave New World, Cynthia Nixon, difference, discrimination, Ethics of science, Frank Bruni, gay rights, genetic determinism, genetics, Huxley, laboratory, New York Times, Nikolas Rose, technology | Comments Off on Wild Bioassumptions?

Wild Bioassumptions?

In the following article, Killian C Quigley considers the power, potential, and responsibilities that come with the increase of bioscience knowledge. By comparing Huxley’s Brave New World to Nikolas Rose’s The Politics of Life Itself: Biomedicine, Power, and Subjectivity in the Twenty-First Century to Frank Bruni’s Genetic or Not, Gay Won’t Go Away, Quigley offers […] Continue reading

Posted in bioethics, biological determinism, biomedicine, bioscience, Brave New World, Cynthia Nixon, difference, discrimination, Ethics of science, Frank Bruni, gay rights, genetic determinism, genetics, Huxley, laboratory, New York Times, Nikolas Rose, technology | Comments Off on Wild Bioassumptions?

Decanted Babies, Racialized Roses: Thingness in Brave New World

The question of humanity in the face of industrialization is a well-known theme in Brave New World, often times wondering whether humanity can even exist in the heavy atmosphere of “Fordism” and assembly-line machines. “Is Brave New Worlds society destroying the human aspect of its people?” is the question most people ask. But Dan Fang […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, decanting, Humanity, Huxley, machines, Racialized roses, thing | Comments Off on Decanted Babies, Racialized Roses: Thingness in Brave New World

The Meaning of Words: Dystopias, Utopias and the Lingusitic

As lovers of literature, we are no strangers to the world of language and expression. But what happens when a society is built upon the tenant that the words not only don’t exist, but carry no meaning? Erin Pellarin explores the meanings words can have on society and personal feeling, comparing John’s repertoire of Shakespearean […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, culture, dystopia, Huxley, linguistics, meaning-making, Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, Science and humanities, Shakespeare, words | Comments Off on The Meaning of Words: Dystopias, Utopias and the Lingusitic

Approaching the Archives: a Librarian’s Perspective

“Every archive is different,” says Deborah Lilton, the librarian for the departments of English, Theatre, and African American Studies here at Vanderbilt University. “Really, the only thing they all have in common is that you can’t take anything home.” As … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in archives, librarians, libraries, Professionalization, research, Successful Strategies | Comments Off on Approaching the Archives: a Librarian’s Perspective

The Disconsolation of Mentality

In the following link, Killian C Quigley compares the narrative structure of Antic Hay to Barri J. Gold’s “The Consolation of Physics: Tennyson’s Thermodynamic Solution,” drawing parallels between the scientific paper and the literature techniques Huxley utilizes. Speculating on a different approach to Huxley’s work, Quigley begins a discussion on the relationship between scientific methodology […] Continue reading

Posted in Antic Hay, Barri J. Gold, Brain, Huxley, In Memoriam, Science and humanities, Tennyson, Thermodynamics | Comments Off on The Disconsolation of Mentality