Monthly Archives: July 2012

Goodbye–well, sort-of.

As is the case with so many good things–my friend Nafissa’s stay in Nashville, my summer break, the box of cupcakes I just polished off while watching an episode of Law and Order–at some point, they must come to an … Continue reading Continue reading

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Balancing Time

One of the most common struggles people have in writing their dissertation is fitting it into their already busy schedule.  Whether it is family obligations or other work commitments, there never seems to be enough time.  My biggest hurdle to … Continue reading Continue reading

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“You Gradgrind”: The Role of Literature in Saturday

Dan Fang questions McEwan’s stance on literature in Saturday as she uses examples of literature’s possible power and influence in Perowne’s life. For a neurosurgeon who doesn’t seem to like literature, Perowne seems to attract quite a bit of poetic justice, both figuratively (with Baxter under his knife at the end) and literally (with Daisy […] Continue reading

Posted in "Saturday, Ian McEwan, ideals, literature, narrative, science, Science and humanities | Comments Off on “You Gradgrind”: The Role of Literature in Saturday

A World of Saturdays: The Unities and Beyond

Analyzing the structure of Ian McEwan’s Saturday, Erin Pellarin discusses Sir Phillip Sidney’s Classical Unities, and how Saturday utilizes them in order to emphasize how, despite the internal nature of the point of view, the outside world and its influences continually pervade the narration. A World of Saturdays: The Unities and BeyondFiled under: Saturday, Science […] Continue reading

Posted in "Classical Unities, "Saturday, Ian McEwan, Invasion of outside world, Science and humanities, Terrorism and War | Comments Off on A World of Saturdays: The Unities and Beyond

Generous Scheherazade

What is the power of fiction? Dan Fang ponders this topic in her blog post as she debates the wavering line between fiction and fact in the world that Powers has presented. If all writing is rewriting, is there such thing as a new story, new material? Or are we simply telling the same stories […] Continue reading

Posted in Arabian Nights, generosity, richard powers, Scheherazade, Science and humanities | Comments Off on Generous Scheherazade

Powers, Pater, Penman: Generosity and Mindfulness

Richard Powers’s book Generosity, An Enhancement might center its narrative around the seemingly unflappable, amicable Thassa Amzwar, but is the book actually ABOUT her? Killian C. Quigley doesn’t seem to think so; using quotes from Walter Pater’s Studies in the History of the Renaissance and Danny Penman, he argues that the fascination with Thassa is […] Continue reading

Posted in 19th Century, 21st century, brain plasticity, cognitive science, Danny Penman, emotional health, Ethics of science, generosity, genetic determinism, happiness, Mark Williams, mental health, mindfulness, pathologization, psychology, richard powers, Science and humanities, Studies in the History of the Renaissance, Walter Pater | Comments Off on Powers, Pater, Penman: Generosity and Mindfulness

The Story on Stories: Narrative in Generosity

Erin Pellarin examines the metafictional aspects of Richard Powers’s Generosity in her blog post, analyzing each major character in order to delve into the stories within the overarching narrative. Through a closer look at the individual characters’ stories, Pellarin brings up a question applicable to our daily lives: what responsibility and ability do we have […] Continue reading

Posted in Cognitive Studies, gene sequencing, genetic engineering, importance of stories, narrative, public sphere versus private, Science and humanities | Comments Off on The Story on Stories: Narrative in Generosity

Writing an Academic Cover Letter

Okay, here’s a moment of full disclosure: in my last job application portfolio, the cover letter was the last thing I wrote because I thought it would be the easiest to write, but also because I didn’t feel it was … Continue reading Continue reading

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Bioethics and Nationality: A Romance

Of course, certain cultural and historical values would affect the decisions and attitudes of their citizens, and Erin Pellarin applies this to bioethics, Chromosome 6, and Never Let Me Go. Using the perceived differences between Britain and America, she argues that a question of humanity becomes a nationalist debate. And perhaps, using this theory, we can […] Continue reading

Posted in American, Chromosome 6, Eddie Izzard, Ethics of science, Never Let Me Go, Priscilla Wald, the human | Comments Off on Bioethics and Nationality: A Romance

The Laws of Life

The “reanimation” of life can refer to much more than zombie media would have us automatically think. Killian C Quigley describes a 1984 court case where the legality of the marketplace for byproducts of life, in order to “reanimate life” came into question. But he also raises the question, “What is life?” Is it a […] Continue reading

Posted in biotechnology, biovalue, Capitalism, Catherine Waldby, Dr. Golde, ecology, Ethics of science, John Moore, Melinda Cooper, Moore v. Regents of the University of California, neoliberalism, reanimation, Robert Mitchell, speculation, Terrence Rafferty, tissue, tissue economies, waste, zombies | Comments Off on The Laws of Life