Monthly Archives: September 2013

The Trouble with Cauliflower by Jane Sutton

The Trouble with Cauliflower, by Jane Sutton, centers on Mortimer and his belief that he has a day of bad luck anytime he eats cauliflower.  One day, his friend, Sadie, makes him dinner.  He eats four helpings of cauliflower stew, and the next day is a disaster! He burns his breakfast, and even worse, fails […] Continue reading

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The Avatar Adventure

Although we had begun to discuss the film in class, I think Avatar is a perfect movie to talk about, especially with regard to topics covered in our course. It is actually one of my favorite movies, and probably the most well executed movie I’ve seen, although I may also be biased considering I watched […] Continue reading

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Can’t Stop the Signal

You would think examining films and movies would be easy for me. After all, my dad has a huge DVD collection that I routinely go through and pick out movies that I haven’t seen. But even with such an extensive selection, my experience with film is rather slanted. With two younger brothers, I spent most […] Continue reading

Posted in film technique, film theory, Serenity | Comments Off on Can’t Stop the Signal

The Hunger Games: The Arena’s Boundaries

I honestly don’t think I have ever hated a movie more than I hated the Hunger Games.  I had fallen in love with the novels and had built up so much hope for the movie and left heart broken (slightly exaggerated obviously, but still, it sucked).  However, this is not a blog post about why […] Continue reading

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Traditional Thursday: The Persian Cinderella

Everyone knows the classic story of Cinderella.   A beautiful, yet lonely girl with two evil stepsisters, a magical fairy godmother, a pair of enchanted glass slippers, a carriage made from a pumpkin, and the happily ever after with her handsome Prince Charming.  Well, what if the story had a bit of a cultural twist?  In […] Continue reading

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Blake and Paine: Devils or Inspired Men?

In his marginal comments to Watson’s An Apology for the Bible, Blake considers Paine’s secular enlightenment assault on revealed religion to be the work of “either a Devil or an Inspired Man” (456).  He also notes that “Paine is a better Christian than the Bishop” (460).  For next Wednesday (10/2), write a post that reflects on […] Continue reading

Posted in 1790s, christianity, Empire vs. Revolution (10/2), Religion, revolution, Thomas Paine | Comments Off on Blake and Paine: Devils or Inspired Men?

Trendy Tuesday: Grumpy Goat

“Stop and smell the flowers.”  It may seem like a goofy or childish saying, but it’s so true.  Even now, as busy college students consumed with work and everything else, it is easy to feel stressed and overwhelmed, grumpy and sluggish.  We are not the only ones who may feel this way at times: elders […] Continue reading

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Leonardo the Terrible Monster

Have you ever just found that no matter how hard you try, you just aren’t good at something? Well, you’re not alone. Leonardo feels the same. In Mo Willem’s book, Leonardo the Terrible Monster, readers connect with a little monster that just can’t seem to scare anyone. Children will smile as Leonardo is compared to […] Continue reading

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“Sentimental Sunday”: Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge

It’s Sunday, so I’m feeling rather sentimental. I chose to review Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge by Mem Fox because it reminds me of my Nana. I was genuinely moved by this sweet story addressing dementia. I had to work to hold back my tears throughout the entire book. Earlier this year, I lost my Nana […] Continue reading

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Inside Out and Back Again: Winner Wednesdays

This National Book Award winner written by Thanhha Lai is about a family moving from Vietnam to the US because their country got destroyed by the Vietnam War. The children had to pack up and leave and come to the United States. In the boat to America, the family had to sleep on mats together. […] Continue reading

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