Monthly Archives: September 2014

Traditional Thursdays: Angelina Ballerina

Most little girls (and some boys too!) dream of being a ballet dancer at some point while growing up. Whether it be the beautifully ornate costumes, graceful movements, or the thrill of performing on stage, ballet dancing always seems to capture the hearts and imagination of children. As a dancer of fifteen years myself, I fell in […] Continue reading

Posted in Ages 3 and up, ballerina, Children's Literature, classic, Dreams, hard work, Helen Craig, Katharine Holabird, mice, Picture Books from the past, Traditional Thursdays | Comments Off on Traditional Thursdays: Angelina Ballerina

Winner Wednesday: Frances Dean Who Loved to Dance and Dance by Brigitta Sif

On this very steamy Winner Wednesday on campus, I will be reviewing Frances Dean Who Loved to Dance and Dance, written and illustrated by Birgitta Sif. This watercolor illustrated book captures the idea of appreciating ones individuality and the power of freedom of expression. Frances Dean is a shy little girl who loves to dance; […] Continue reading

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Locomotive

This week on Winning Wednesday I will be reviewing Locomotive, the 2014 Caldecott Award winner, by Brian Floca. Locomotive allows readers to enter a time long ago when the transcontinental railroad had just finished being built. Children learn about how the first trains looked and worked in this narrative nonfiction story. With its amazing illustrations and […] Continue reading

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Trendy Tuesday: Draw!

This wordless picture by Raul Colon allows children is beyond captivating. I was captured by Aaron Becker’s Journey, so when I saw this book I knew I had to read it. Much like Becker, Colon’s illustrations are beautiful, but nothing like the story behind it. A young boy who has just read about Africa decides […] Continue reading

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Marvelous New Picture Books: Day Dreamers

For this week’s “Marvelous New Picture Book”, we felt it necessary to review Day Dreamers- A Journey of Imagination written and illustrated by Emily Winfield Martin. The magical cover of this book instantly drew us in, the breathtaking shades of blue and green creating a captivating entrance for the reader. We both are huge fans of the […] Continue reading

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Free Friday – Seeds of Freedom: The Peaceful Integration of Huntsville, Alabama

I read the perfect children’s book this past week to introduce on this Free Friday: Hester Bass’s Seeds of Freedom.  The child-friendly nonfiction book tells the story of the series of peaceful protests that contributed to the integration in Huntsville, Alabama.  Throughout the text freedom vegetation diction is used to metaphorize freedom: we see the seedling […] Continue reading

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Mirror’s Edge Made Me Throw Up – A Squid’s Tale

(More shaky camera, please make it more shaky) For years, I’ve felt behind the gaming curve and have always yearned to play the games that have passed me by. I’ve wanted to know what it was like to play deep into the night and this summer I had the opportunity to find out what the […] Continue reading

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The Evolution of Video Games and the Diminishing Relevance of Failure

By Thomas Adams In class, we began discussing failure in video games. The most common version of failure in video games in gameplay failure. Gameplay failure is when the player fails to complete a task that he/she must complete in order to progress in the game. This could be failing to solve a puzzle (e.g. Portal), dying to […] Continue reading

Posted in Arcade, arcade games, Class Related, Donkey Kong, evolution of gaming, failure, Gaming, Nintendo, Opinion, Super Mario Bros, Video Games | Comments Off on The Evolution of Video Games and the Diminishing Relevance of Failure

Failure in Payoff in “Interactive” Media

This week, I was very intrigued by our discussion of the “doomed quest.” This idea is particularly pertinent to our reading of “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came,” where the narrator sets out on his journey with full knowledge that even if he ‘succeeds’ (reaches the end), he will die. The fated tragedy is […] Continue reading

Posted in Class Related, failure, gameplay, Gaming, narrative, Narrative failure, New Media, Payoff, Video Games | Comments Off on Failure in Payoff in “Interactive” Media

E-Sports: History of E-Sports

By: Jo Kim E-sports, short for electronic sports, is a term for competition among professionals. The first “e-sport” tournament started out as an arcade game tournament (Space Invaders Tournament) in 1980, hosted by Atari, and these arcade were commonly seen throughout the next decade. Following the era of arcade gaming came the era of computer […] Continue reading

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