Monthly Archives: March 2015

Explore Vesta with Vesta Trek

Today, NASA released Vesta Trek, a free web-based application that provides a detailed visualization of Vesta, one of the largest asteroids in the Solar System. This was made possible by NASA’s Dawn spacecraft, which studied Vesta from July 2011 to September 2012. This application includes interactive maps, the ability to print Vesta in a 3-D printer, […] Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in astro201, blog7, Ceres, Dawn, Instruments, NASA, Solar System: Small SS Objects, technology, vesta, VestaTrek | Comments Off on Explore Vesta with Vesta Trek

United States Space Force

It’s actually called the Air Force Space Command, and it has its headquarters at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. Space Command is relatively new, and the programs it has consolidated and eradicated to get to this point is impressive and a bit dizzying, but I think important to understand how the Air Force came to […] Continue reading Continue reading

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Mercurial Art

“It appears that Mercury may well be a painted planet,” said Prof Peter Schultz, a co-author from Brown University. Mercury’s dull surface has long been a point of perplexion in the field of planetary geology. Scientists have thought that there must be a mystery darkening agent contributing to the planet’s low reflectance. A new study has given […] Continue reading Continue reading

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Trendy Tuesday: Nightsong

While this book isn’t super recent (published in 2012), I had never heard of it and really enjoyed stumbling upon it in the bookstore. Nightsong is a picture book with unique illustrations telling the story of a bat named Chiro that finally gets the courage to leave his cave and the adventures he encounters. I love the […] Continue reading

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The “Vanished Children”: Routinized War in Spin and Beyond

Alex Ox comments on perpetual war and pre-traumatic stress syndrome in Wilson’s Spin.
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The Weather At The End Of The World in Wilson’s SPIN

I enjoyed Max B.’s article comparing Wilson’s novel Spin to the Lars von Trier movie Melancholia, particularly as they confronted the question of climate change.
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Creating Nanoworlds: Fear and Technology in Robert Charles Wilson’s Spin

W. Smeele has an interesting post on the boundary between human and non-human sentience in Wilson’s Hugo Award winning novel: Creating Nanoworlds: Fear and Technology in The Spin.  Filed under: Aliens, Biology Continue reading

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The Weather At The End Of The World

While reading Robert Charles Wilson’s 2005 novel, Spin, I couldn’t help but think of another one of my favorite visions of the apocalypse, Lars Von Trier’s 2011 film, Melancholia. Like Wilson’s Spin, Melancholia opens with a plush party (in thi… Continue reading

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The “Vanished Children”: Routinized War in Spin and Beyond

In “Air War Prophecy and Interwar Modernism,” Paul K. Saint-Amour posits a “routinization of emergency” and draws upon Lewis Mumford’s The Culture of Cities to describe a “collective psychosis” which was instigated by pre-war anxiety. Sai… Continue reading

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Marvelous Monday: Making Non-Fiction Marvelous

Today for Marvelous Monday, we decided to look at a genre of books children might not usually find that marvelous and fun: non-fiction!  We searched for a book that was trendy and introduces new information to students in a completely attainable, understandable way. With that in mind, we found Environment Infographics by Chris Oxlade, which […] Continue reading

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