Monthly Archives: March 2015

Creating Nanoworlds: Fear and Technology in Spin

Perusing a robotics installation at the Museum of Science in Boston, MA this weekend, I came across a display on RoboBees. These fascinating micro-robots are technological replacements for diminishing honeybee colonies, created to supplement our most i… Continue reading

Posted in Boston Museum of Science, Charles Wilson, Hypotheticals, nanobots, nanoculture, RoboBees, Science Fiction, Spin, technoscience, von Neumann ecology | Comments Off on Creating Nanoworlds: Fear and Technology in Spin

Traditional Thursdays: The Tale of Peter Rabbit

In 1902, Beatrix Potter’s The Tale of Peter Rabbit was published, and Potter created a character that would be remembered for years to come. Potter instantly transports readers into a world of fantasy and action as she begins the story with, “Once upon a time.” Given the age of the story, some language is antiquated, yet it […] Continue reading

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Winners Wednesdays: The Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread

In 2004, the Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread won the 2004 Newbery Medal. In addition to reading this book for our Children’s Lit class, I also read this book as a child and saw the movie and have absolutely loved it. I […] Continue reading

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The Goldilocks Zone: Not as elusive as previously thought?

New research from the Australian National University and the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen has calculated that billions of the milky Way star’s have one to three planets in the habitable zone (or nicknamed: “The Goldilocks Zone” because…

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Posted in Aliens, astro201, blog8, Exoplanets, habitablezone, Stars | Comments Off on The Goldilocks Zone: Not as elusive as previously thought?

Do we have Jupiter to thank for Earth?

A new study by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences revealed that Jupiter may just be more than the largest gas giant planet in our solar system. We little earthlings may be here thanks to Jupiter and its…

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Posted in Astro 201, blog7, Jovians, jupiter, Solar System, SolarSystem | Comments Off on Do we have Jupiter to thank for Earth?

Trendy Tuesday: Fancy Nancy

Fancy Nancy by Jane O’Connor is flying of the shelves. The first book came out in 2006 and now there are numerous picture books, countless activity and I can read book, and even a few chapter books based off of the first book. Nancy is a girl who loves to be fancy. She loves to […] Continue reading

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Marvelous New Picture Books: Winnie: The True Story of the Bear Who Inspired Winnie-the-Pooh

  Happy Monday, readers! Today’s Marvelous New Picture Book is Winnie: The True Story of the Bear who Inspired Winnie-the-Pooh. Author Sally M. Walker tells the heart-warming and true tale of Winnie, a bear cub who is adopted by an army veterinarian during World War I and eventually becomes the inspiration for A.A. Milne’s classic Winnie-the-Pooh stories. […] Continue reading

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Nanotechnology and the NanoNarrative: Is Small the New Big?

Brooks Landon’s essay, “Less is More: Much Less is Much More: The Insistent Allure of Nanotechnology in Science Fiction” in the anthology, Nanoculture begins with a true statement of storytelling if I’ve ever heard one: “Size has … Continue reading

Posted in Brooks Landon, culture, history of science, homunculus, nanonarrative, nanotechnology, narrative, science, Science Fiction, Structure of Scientific Revolutions, technology, technoscience, Thomas Kuhn, Visuality | Comments Off on Nanotechnology and the NanoNarrative: Is Small the New Big?

Education, Nanotechnology, and the Magic School Bus?: Rethinking the relationship between science and science-fiction

“Who, then, are the real ‘engineers of the future’?” -Colin Milbun, Nanovision In Nanovision, Colin Milburn explores the way in which scientific discourse and the generic conventions of science-fiction blur in the study of nanotechnology. Inde… Continue reading

Posted in Colin Milburn, education, humanities, Magic School Bus, N. Katherine Hayles, nanotechnology, Nanovision, popular science, science, Science Education, Science Fiction, technology, technoscience | Comments Off on Education, Nanotechnology, and the Magic School Bus?: Rethinking the relationship between science and science-fiction

“Big Things Have Small Beginnings”: Ridley Scott’s Prometheus (2012) on Nanotechnology

At first glance, nanotechnology (technology on an atomic or molecular scale) and hyperobjects (defined by Timothy Morton as “things that are massively distributed in time and space relative to humans”) may seem like two destinations for scientific … Continue reading

Posted in AI, Alien franchise, androids, big things have small beginnings, black goo, David, film, Hyperobjects, Jane Bennett, Lawrence of Arabia, Michael Fassbender, nanotechnology, Peter O'Toole, Prometheus, Ridley Scott, Science Fiction, technoscience, the singularity, Timothy Morton, vibrant matter | Comments Off on “Big Things Have Small Beginnings”: Ridley Scott’s Prometheus (2012) on Nanotechnology