Monthly Archives: November 2015

Where Does The Carbon Go?

Signing off with your fortnightly dose of science news. The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere recently surpassed 400 parts per million, higher than it has been anytime in the past 400,000 years. But only half of the human produced carbo… Continue reading

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Why am I so turned off by cli-fi?

I used to love the Maximum Rider book series. It had everything: a strong female lead, genetic engineering, romance based on companionship, and humans with wings. On the long car rides from Florida to Mobile in the summer, my dad would play the audio b… Continue reading

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Free Fridays: Cendrillon

Cinderella is one of the most popular European folk tales in all of history, and hundreds if not thousands of different versions and retellings have been recorded. Most Western children are familiar with the “classic” Cinderella story told in traditional tales and movies such as Disney’s titular 1950 film. However, there are now many versions […] Continue reading

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Traditional Thursdays: The Tiny Seed

From the author and illustrator who is well-known for The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Eric Carle wrote a traditional story of change in the life cycle with his book The Tiny Seed, published in 1970. The story begins with a seed pod releasing all of its seeds into the air, with one especially tiny seed included. […] Continue reading

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Gender Roles in Avatar: An Overdue Step Forward for Science Fiction

Several of my fellow classmates have written blog posts about their discomfort with the misogynistic angle that several science fiction stories adopt. Rightfully so, I would argue — the hypermasculine protagonists and the passive, meek female cha… Continue reading

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Winner Wednesday: Blackout

Blackout by John Rocco tells the story of a family during a power outage in New York City. The book won the Caldecott Honor in 2012, and from the beautiful scene on the cover alone, it’s clear why. The book begins with a boy, wanting to spend time with his family who is all much […] Continue reading

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What Do I Have to Hide?

By focusing on what to keep private rather than what to publicize, teens often inadvertently play into another common rhetorical crutch – the notion that privacy is only necessary for those who have something to hide (boyd, 63). When social media first began to crop up in my household, my parents weren’t sure how to […] Continue reading

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Protection, or Paranoia?

“Some teens see privacy as a right, but many more see privacy as a matter of trust. Thus, when their parents choose to snoop or lurk or read their online posts, these teens see it as a signal of distrust.” In this quote from her book It’s Complicated, danah boyd points out the potential effects of […] Continue reading

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I’ve Heard it Both Ways

It’s easy to think of privacy and publicity as opposing concepts, and a lot of technology is built on the assumption that you have to choose to be private or public. Yet in practice, both privacy and publicity are blurred.     (danah 76) As with many of the issues surrounding cryptography, privacy versus publicity […] Continue reading

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Cryptography » Student Posts 2015-11-10 20:03:05

Taking a structuralist tactic, legal scholar Alan Westin argues that privacy is “the claim of individuals, groups, or institutions to determine for themselves when, how, and to what extent information about them is communicated to others,” (boyd, 59). With all of the definitions and specifics of privacy that dana boyd gives in Chapter Two of […] Continue reading

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