Monthly Archives: February 2018

Winner Wednesday: Where the Wild Things Are

Where the Wild Things Are by Maurie Sendak was one of my favorite books growing up and since it has not been reviewed on the blog in a while I wanted to feature it for this week’s “winners Wednesday”. Sendak received the Caldecott medal for the book in 1964 and many other smaller awards and […] Continue reading

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Trendy Tuesdays: Dear Girl,

With a lot of focus in the media on female empowerment it is not surprising that this message is being passed along to children in the form of picture books. The book Dear Girl,, written by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Paris Rosenthal and illustrated by Holly Hatam, is one of those books that seeks to […] Continue reading

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Marvelous New Picture Book Monday: Chef Roy Choi and the Street Food Remix

I just finished reading Chef Roy Choi and the Street Food Remix written by Jacqueline Briggs Martin and June Jo Lee and I highly enjoyed it. The cover of the book is very eye-catching with the colors and the graffiti-style illustrations. This book is unlike any other than I’ve read so far in children’s literature and I […] Continue reading

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Learning the Ropes about Tropes

Spoiler alert for Gone Home — Don’t read further if you want to avoid spoilers. Just say the word “western,” and I can immediately visualize a high noon showdown, as if I were hiding behind a barrel on the porch of a saloon. Say “sci-fi,” and now we’re zipping by the stars at light speed … Continue reading “Learning the Ropes about Tropes” Continue reading

Posted in Fiction, Games, Gaming, Gone Home, Horror, Mystery, narrative, Opinion | Comments Off on Learning the Ropes about Tropes

What Do You Do With a Problem?

What Do You Do With a Problem? was published in 2016 by Compendium. This story, written by Kobi Yamada and illustrated by Mae Besom, follows a child through their journey with a problem. The child tries to ignore their problem but quickly realizes that this problem starts to take over and demand their attention. The […] Continue reading

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Prophets against Empire

In his marginal comments to Watson’s An Apology for the Bible, Blake considers Thomas Paine’s secular enlightenment assault on revealed religion to be the work of “either a Devil or an Inspired Man” (456).  He also notes that “Paine is a better Christian than the Bishop” (460).  For next Wednesday (2/28), write a post that reflects […] Continue reading

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Prophets against Empire

In his marginal comments to Watson’s An Apology for the Bible, Blake considers Thomas Paine’s secular enlightenment assault on revealed religion to be the work of “either a Devil or an Inspired Man” (456).  He also notes that “Paine is a better Christian than the Bishop” (460).  For next Wednesday (2/28), write a post that reflects […] Continue reading

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I Believe I can Fly

In Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, “A Memorable Fancy,” is an eerie message in in which the Devil is basically tempting humanity to feel exaltation, even more so, by not just simply using our five senses, but finding a way to embody the same powers that God does to see, hear, touch, and […] Continue reading

Posted in Christ and the Body (9/25), Poetic Genius, William Blake, william blake marriage of heaven and hell, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on I Believe I can Fly

William Blake and An Alternative Genius

William Blake’s A Memorable Fancy has elements that speak to Moravian themes and ideas. Blake writes about a “Genius” that doesn’t necessarily align with the intellectual, academic, or conventional genius that’s taught at big universities. Blake’s is a different kind of genius, one Marsha Keith Schuchard writes about in her article titled “Young William Blake […] Continue reading

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Chained by the Giant

Blake’s disagreements with the system of the Royal Academy was greatly influenced by his mother, who was before influenced by Zinzendorf, bishop of the Moravian Church. Zinzendorf strongly advocated a healthy mother-child relationship and Blake later incorporates themes of a mother-child relationship in many of his works. Zinzendorf’s childhood of being sent away to boarding […] Continue reading

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