Monthly Archives: September 2018

Breaking Codes Is Much More Difficult In Practice

In Chapter 3, Singh provides an example of breaking codes with keywords and makes everything seems quite easy. However, in practice, breaking such a code is definitely difficult and needs a lot of time and work. Say you have a message which is enciphered by using a keyword as long as the plaintext. The first thing is […] Continue reading

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A Higher Moral Purpose

The Chancellor’s Lecture series featured guest General Michael V. Hayden, the former NSA and CIA director interviewed by Chancellor Zeppos and Professor Jon Meacham. A topic General Hayden addressed was the morality and ethicality of his past work. He acknowledged “We (intelligence agencies) operate in a grey space…It (the work of the CIA and NSA) […] Continue reading

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Necessity and Usability

The primary factor favouring the advancement of military cryptography is when a country realizes their war efforts have been compromised due to the lack of strong encryption. For example, Arthur Scherbius’ Enigma machine was unpopular with the German military prior to the publishing of the histories of the First World War as written by Winston […] Continue reading

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Free Fridays: Heart and the Bottle

In 2009, The Heart and the Bottle, written and illustrated by Oliver Jeffers, was published. We have been gifted several of his books the past few years and my daughters consistently choose them to be read to them. It is for that reason that, when I was searching for a story to start to introduce […] Continue reading

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Free Friday: One of a Kind, Like Me

The book One of a Kind, Like Me tells the true story of author Laurin Mayeno’s son Danny. In the book, Danny wants to dress up as a princess for the school’s parade. The text follows his journey in finding and designing his costume, wearing it to school, and experiencing his classmates’ reactions. The text […] Continue reading

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“The Assault on Intelligence”

General Michael Hayden, the former NSA and CIA director for the United States, was interviewed by Professor Jon Meacham and Chancellor Nicholas Zeppos. Questions regarding national security and the current direction of the U.S. were proposed to Gen. Hayden. To kick off the interview, Meacham proposed the question, “Does political partisanship and national security have […] Continue reading

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A Dissection of the Round Table with the General and the Chancellor

I thought that this lecture was very interesting, although it didn’t really focus on what I thought it was going to focus on. Instead of talking about the debate between surveillance and privacy, they mainly focused on political issues as well as the art of on the ground surveillance. The general was the former director […] Continue reading

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Same Old, Same Old?

Throughout this course we have gone over the influential nature of literature movements on newer forms of media and how varied—but sometimes similar—themes are evoked through different mediums. Specifically, we have studied the effect of J.R.R. Tolkien’s work on the evolving media landscape. To credit Tolkien and his legendarium, it’s easy to say that his … Continue reading “Same Old, Same Old?” Continue reading

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Traditional Thursday: Just a Dream

Published in 1990, Chris van Allsburg’s Just a Dream is a traditional classic that has gained significant value in recent years. When it was originally written, it was a warning call of what could transpire in the world around us. Now, van Allsburg’s tale is becoming a haunting reality. Traffic, smog, and garbage actually threaten the […] Continue reading

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Winner’s Wednesday: Charlie & Mouse

For this week’s Winner Wednesday I selected the Geisel 2018 Medal Winner, Charlie & Mouse. This wonderful picture book, written by Lauren Snyder, illustrated by Emily Hughes, and published by Chronicle books, is a short chapter/picture book that depicts a day in the life of two young brothers, Charlie and Mouse. The chapters are Lumps, […] Continue reading

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