Author Archives: AnEyeToward

Biocultures in Academic Medicine: A Not-So-Accidental Tourist

For the past two months, I’ve taken a return to the roots I know so well:  a humanities-based-interloper, standing on the outskirts of medicine and surgery as a quietly enthusiastic groupie.  Working with the Chair of the Surgery department at … Continue reading

Posted in academic medicine, grand rounds, medicine, residency, surgery, surgical culture, truth, truthiness | Comments Off on Biocultures in Academic Medicine: A Not-So-Accidental Tourist

When You Stare Into the Uncanny Valley, the Uncanny Valley Also Stares Into You: Posthuman Narratives in The Windup Girl

Like my dear colleague A.M. Lehr below, I also couldn’t help but make the comparison between Paolo Bacigaluipi’s The Windup Girl and E.T.A. Hoffman’s The Sandman… Possibly because of the “uncanny” resemblance in the … Continue reading

Posted in biopolitics, eta hoffman, Gender studies, jacques offenbach, narrative, Novelists, Paolo Bacigalupi, post-human, Science Fiction, technoscience, the sandman, The Windup Girl, uncanny, uncanny valley | Comments Off on When You Stare Into the Uncanny Valley, the Uncanny Valley Also Stares Into You: Posthuman Narratives in The Windup Girl

Nanotechnology and the NanoNarrative: Is Small the New Big?

Brooks Landon’s essay, “Less is More: Much Less is Much More: The Insistent Allure of Nanotechnology in Science Fiction” in the anthology, Nanoculture begins with a true statement of storytelling if I’ve ever heard one: “Size has … Continue reading

Posted in Brooks Landon, culture, history of science, homunculus, nanonarrative, nanotechnology, narrative, science, Science Fiction, Structure of Scientific Revolutions, technology, technoscience, Thomas Kuhn, Visuality | Comments Off on Nanotechnology and the NanoNarrative: Is Small the New Big?

On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

***This post contains spoilers!  If you are reading this, and you haven’t finished Oryx and Crake, step away from the computer and get back to it!*** I read Oryx and Crake primarily as a novel of trauma, extending past the genocidal crescendo of… Continue reading

Posted in Atwood, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, gender, meaning-making, narrative, narrative structure, Novelists, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, subjectivity | Comments Off on On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

De-Sensitizing the Operating Room: Normalizing the “Unnatural” in The Island of Dr. Moreau

I say I became habituated to the Beast People, that a thousand things that had seemed unnatural and repulsive speedily became natural and ordinary to me. (The Island of Dr. Moreau, End of Chapter 15) I used to consider myself a very squeamish person. T… Continue reading

Posted in "victorian literature, 19th Century, 20th Century, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, Ethics of science, H.G. Wells, history of science, role of scientists, Science Fiction, technology, The Island of Dr. Moreau, Visuality | Comments Off on De-Sensitizing the Operating Room: Normalizing the “Unnatural” in The Island of Dr. Moreau

Caged in Desire, or How to Read an Unreliable Narrator: Anxiety, Projection, and Crushes in Henry James’s In the Cage

I’d like to open this post with some mood music: There we go.  That sets the stage nicely. In other words, In the Cage is a stomach-turning read for any fantasy-prone person (re: most of us) who has ever had an unrequited crush.  Let’s th… Continue reading

Posted in "victorian literature, 19th Century, disillusion, Freud, Gender studies, Henry James, humanities, In the Cage, mechanical servant, narrative, narrative structure, Novelists, subjectivity | Comments Off on Caged in Desire, or How to Read an Unreliable Narrator: Anxiety, Projection, and Crushes in Henry James’s In the Cage

Objectivity, and Other Myths We Tell Ourselves

I come to my literature degree still carrying the baggage of having worked in a hospital operating room for a long time. Maybe it is not surprising to say that I have left filled with images and stories, and I am still trying to find a way of articulat… Continue reading

Posted in 20th Century, biomedicine, history of science, Lorraine Daston, meaning-making, objectivity, Peter Galison, subjectivity, Visuality | Comments Off on Objectivity, and Other Myths We Tell Ourselves