Author Archives: astronomydylan

Could Ultraviolet rays emitted by stars make planets uninhabitable?

We know that astronomers look to low-mass star systems for signs of life.  But new research from NASA has indicated that these low-mass stars may emit substantial amounts of ultraviolet radiation during their lifetime, hindering if not eliminating the possibility of life on orbiting planets. Of course, astronomers look at terrestrial worlds that lie in … Continue reading Could Ultraviolet rays emitted by stars make planets uninhabitable? Continue reading Continue reading

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Hubble Space Telescope Images the Most Distant Star Ever Observed

Last week, a group of astronomers announced in Nature Astronomy that they had discovered the furthest star ever seen: a blue supergiant named Icarus that shone nearly 10 billion years ago, and located more than halfway across the universe. The astronomers were able to do this with the Hubble, and gravitational lensing. Per the lead author of … Continue reading Hubble Space Telescope Images the Most Distant Star Ever Observed Continue reading Continue reading

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Aurora Footprint of Jupiter’s Moons

We all are familiar with the Galilean Moons; those 4 largest moons orbiting Jupiter which Galileo discovered with his telescope, and which were subsequently named after his lovers. Three of these moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede) have created auroral bursts in Jupiter’s atmosphere, but Callisto had only yielded two potential footprints … until last month! We know how … Continue reading Aurora Footprint of Jupiter’s Moons Continue reading Continue reading

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A Powerful Letter

Chapter 3 explained to us how Galileo solidified the Copernican revolution, and sealed the case on how Earth would be viewed in perspective of the universe. In 1615, Galileo wrote a letter to Grand Duchess Christina, in attempt to accommodate his observations’ confirmation of Copernicanism with the doctrines and scripture of the Church. He held … Continue reading A Powerful Letter Continue reading Continue reading

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Physics in the Olympics

We have all heard the joke which rings all too true: the Olympics need one average person competing for reference. Last night, olympic figure skaters dazzled the international community with their many spins and jumps. I found myself extremely curious as to how the skaters are able to spin so many times with apparent ease. … Continue reading Physics in the Olympics Continue reading Continue reading

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Historical Astronomers in Context

Galileo is the astronomer most responsible for toppling the geocentric theory of the universe with his scientific observations. Galileo used a telescope to prove that there were visible sunspots on the sun and craters on the moon, arguing that if these surfaces were imperfect then their orbits could be as well. He also discovered that … Continue reading Historical Astronomers in Context Continue reading Continue reading

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Anaxagoras

Known most for bringing philosophy to Athens before the era of Socrates, Anaxagoras is recognized as the first person in history to correctly explain eclipses. He claimed that material variation was caused by relative preponderance over other ingredients, explaining how change could occur in the pre-Socratic era. Before him, there stands no record of anybody … Continue reading Anaxagoras Continue reading Continue reading

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