Author Archives: conorastr201

Europa Report

This past weekend, I watched a movie on Netflix called Europa Report. The movie was a detailed the gripping journey of six people on their trip Europa with the sole mission of confirming or denying the existence of life on Jupiter’s moon Europa. Not only was this a great, well done film, but it also touched on […] Continue reading Continue reading

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Studying the Effects of Space Travel on the Human Body

NASA is conducting an experiment to determine the effects of living in space on the human body. Such studies have been done before, but this one is unprecedented in the length of time the subject will spend in space (a full 365 days) and in that the participants are identical twins. One astronaut named Scott […] Continue reading Continue reading

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Planet Discovered with Four Parent Stars

Binary star systems, like the one featured in the Tatooine system of Star Wars are common in the universe with half of all systems being comprised that way. Ternary system, or systems with three stars, are more rare, and even more rare are quaternion systems. Planets within these four star systems are also rare, so much so […] Continue reading Continue reading

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Salt Water Oceans Thought to be on Ganymede

Astronomers have recently determined that Jupiter’s largest moon Ganymede likely has an ocean of salt water underneath its icy, inhospitable crust. Ganymede is the only moon in our solar system that has a functioning magnetic field; because of this it is also the only one to have auroras. Scientists in Cologne studied these auroras over a […] Continue reading Continue reading

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NASA’s Dawn Spacecraft Orbits Ceres

That’s no moon! Just this past week, the Dawn spacecraft entered orbit around Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt. The dward planet is one of the oldest planetary object left in our solar system, and as such could provide valuable information about the early formation of the planets; it is an in-between step, a […] Continue reading Continue reading

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The Continual Search for Planets

The discovery of new life-harboring planets has been a hot topic in the last century, but there has always been a limitation: we couldn’t see other planets. However, observational technologies and techniques have progressed to the point where we may be able to find more Earth-like planets within a few short years. The main problems […] Continue reading Continue reading

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The Scale of Atoms and Modern Processors

Everyone knows that atoms are small, but exactly how small is small? This new video by Kurz Gesagt explores this question, and the sheer scale is mind boggling to try to imagine. Among the analogies used is that of filling rooms with rice grains; if the end of your finger was the size of the room, and […] Continue reading Continue reading

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Historical Astronomers in Context

Johannes Kepler is remembered mostly for his discovery that the orbits of stellar objects are elliptical, as well as for his laws of motion, which he did using the observations gathered by Tycho Brahe. His work helped merge the ideas of physics and astronomy together. Additionally, he was prominent in the field of optics and […] Continue reading Continue reading

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The Search for Habitable Exoplanets

Earlier this month, the Kepler space telescope spotted three planets of Earth-like size orbiting in a nearby star’s “habitable zone,” or the area around the star in which water could exist in liquid form on a planet’s surface. However, the planets they found, along with the other 26 Earth-like exoplanets found thus far, do not […] Continue reading Continue reading

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