Author Archives: dlizaola

What A Long Strange Trip It’s Been

Daniel Lizaola Lopez Humberto Garcia English 190: Senior Thesis May 2, 2018 I wasn’t always an English major. I was lost in the vortex of societal norms and allowed the cosmology of my origin be originated by my environment. In high school, I was influenced by Ernesto “Che” Guevara and his passions. For the duration […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Earth, environment, essay, health, Humanity, life, literature, poetry, Reflective Essay (5/2), Self, society, system, teaching, truth, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on What A Long Strange Trip It’s Been

Urizen weeps because he can’t bear to touch himself

Milton wants to celebrate self-love through the journey of sexual liberation, breaking away from the Urizen state of mind that “dares to mock with the aspersion of Madness/Cast on the Inspired, by the tame high finisher of paltry Blots” (202). The madness of course being the image offered through plate 47: two men–one enjoys the […] Continue reading

Posted in contraries, Los, masturbation, negation, sexuality, The Last Judgment (4/4-4/11), Urizen, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Urizen weeps because he can’t bear to touch himself

why’s satan trying to be god so bad?

Milton martyrs himself as the savior of his people, which is ironic because he doesn’t agree on the ideas of war or any type of heroic characteristic for that matter. However, he’s being forced into the eternal death because God is inactive in the fight against satan; he takes off his robe of promise, that […] Continue reading

Posted in Blake, God, Milton, poetry, Religion, Satan, The Last Judgment (11/6-11/13), William Blake's reception | Comments Off on why’s satan trying to be god so bad?

The Reason He Cries

Urizen is ultimately weeping about the same thing: the emergence of Los, or, revolution of the peoples through the ashes of long forgotten imaginations. His rule over the world is coming to an end, which is why in “Africa”, he “gave it into the hands of Newton & Locke” (110); “it“ being the ideology of reason. […] Continue reading

Posted in Africa, Asia, literature, Locke, Los, Newton, tears, Urizen, Urizen's Tears (3/21), William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on The Reason He Cries

dreaming aint just for men

Enitharmon’s dream was gendered as female because of its connection to Los; hitherto, Europe was ruled and dictated by a man’s dream, hence: “eighteen hundred years: Man was a Dream!” (12/9, line 2, 101). The logic of reason, or the ideology understood through the character Urizen, had been the contemporary order of society. Therefore, by […] Continue reading

Posted in Dreams, Enitharmon, Los, The Flames of Orc (3/14), Urizen, William Blake, William Blake's reception, women | Comments Off on dreaming aint just for men

The Pain of Will

Though William Blake is not anti-religious as Thomas Paine is, they both share a similar distaste for the church and state and how they operate (rule) society. In Thomas Paine’s “The Rights of Man Part 1”, he argues against the fallacy of his government: “what is government more than the management of the affairs of […] Continue reading

Posted in children, christianity, Empire vs. Revolution (2/28), Government, literature, poetry, politics, Religion, society, system, Thomas Paine, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on The Pain of Will

Filing for a divorce with hell.

Blakes touches on his idea of the poetic Genius again, in “Provers of Hell”; he claims that it is both a natural–not taught–kind of Genius, and that it isn’t necessarily the best looking process. Blake writes in lines 66-7: “Improvement makes strait roads, but the crooked roads without Improvement, are roads of Genius.” This goes […] Continue reading

Posted in Heaven and Hell, literature, Marriage of Heaven and Hell, Poetic Genius, Proverbs of Hell (2/14), teaching, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Filing for a divorce with hell.

Dreaming Songs of Ambivalence

The innocence that is found in “A Dream” is bounded by the warm opportunistic tone offered in the last two stanzas, especially the last the line: Pitying, I dropped a tear: But I saw a glow-worm near, Who replied, ‘What wailing wight Calls the watchman of the night? ‘I am set to light the ground, […] Continue reading

Posted in Dreams, English, experience, Experience, Earth, and Adulthood (2/7), innocence, literature, subconscious, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Dreaming Songs of Ambivalence

The Old Geezer w/ the Beard

Our bodies were warm in the sun of morn, As the other kids began to tease out my name. “What a dork; he still needs mommy’s permission.”   Tugging on her arm, I cried, “please mama,” Her gaze went over my head, “it is not up to me “Child. Ask your father. And take your […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Beard, Blake, English, Innocence, Eden, and Childhood (1/27), Lit, literature, Old dude, Story, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on The Old Geezer w/ the Beard

There are no rules to the genius

Sir Joshua Reynolds argues in Discourse III, “could we teach taste or genius by rules, they would be no longer taste and genius” (44). Which is to say that there is an unnatural, innate power of “taste” and “genius” that cannot be taught–or shouldn’t. That seems to debunk the whole idea of mentor and mentee relationships, […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Blake's philosophy of art (8/28), Genius, Imitation, nature, perception, Sir Joshua Reynolds, teaching, William Blake | Comments Off on There are no rules to the genius