Author Archives: evinske

The Fermi Paradox

To be, or not to be? Is that really the question? According to the Fermi Paradox, it’s a perfectly valid one. The Fermi Paradox, coined after Enrico Fermi, is a theory that addresses life elsewhere in the universe as a probable reality. The only issue is, however, that no other forms of life (that we […] Continue reading Continue reading

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Carl Sa(vior)gan

We read about them in our textbooks. They’re the giants with discoveries that make our understandings of moon phases and seasonal changes seem minuscule and insignificant. We stand on their shoulders when we learn about atmospheric conditions on different planets. We hold their hands while launching expensive equipment into the hardly-known (space). We sometimes name this […] Continue reading Continue reading

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The Solar Shepherds

Rings. It’s what many senior girls are looking for right now, just as graduation approaches. Spring brings the rings, right? The giant planets, however, sport perhaps the most breathtaking rings of all. What many won’t notice about rings of giant planets, such as Saturn, are its imperfections. The darker regions of the rings do not […] Continue reading Continue reading

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When the Sun Shows Off

  There’s a spectacular light show every year at the Opryland Hotel in Nashville, Tennessee. The grand venue boasts thousands and thousands of lights each year around Christmas. Yet, you don’t have to find a $30 parking spot at a debatably overrated hotel to see a grand, sparkling event. In fact, there’s a place giving […] Continue reading Continue reading

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These Are Not the Droids We’re Looking For

Knowledge is power. We want more and more of it. It’s no surprise, then, that we see the Solar System as a well full of knowledge we’ve never encountered before. So, we send spacecrafts out into the Solar System, looking for information. We want pictures, data, surprises, and (now) sound. We’re obsessed. But we too often […] Continue reading Continue reading

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HW #B3 – A Superpower Redefined

Be it an elementary school sleepover or a university orientation, there’s always a place and time for the infamous question: If you could have any superpower, what would it be? Some people say they’d love to fly or breathe underwater, but one of the most popular answers is X-ray vision. The entire process behind X-ray […] Continue reading Continue reading

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Historical Astronomers in Context – Homework #6

2. Nicholas Copernicus (1473-1543) was important to astronomy because he served as a pioneer in drifting away from the geocentric model of the universe. He dove tediously into the tables and mathematics of the previous, geocentric model of the universe and found enlightenment in geometry. He thereby successfully determined the distances between planets and the Sun, as […] Continue reading Continue reading

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SCED: The Science of Perspectivism

Hey guys! Rani and I have been talking a lot about perspective for this week’s blog. First, I wanted to think about the place historical context holds in a STEM course similar to this one. Dr. G mentioned last Tuesday that our lecture about historic science (Copernicus, Tycho, Gallileo, etc.) would likely be the last […] Continue reading Continue reading

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“Goodnight Nobody, Goodnight Mush”

When we think we can’t see the moon, it can definitely see us. This doesn’t just hold true when we’re sleeping. As the children’s book, “Goodnight Moon,” goes, we may say “Goodnight” to the moon – but it’s still there outside our window and outside our atmosphere. Different parts of the moon disappear at different […] Continue reading Continue reading

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Light Travel: The “New” Hyperspace

We’ve read it in our beloved science fiction books. Superheroes and intelligent beings from other worlds harness massive amounts of energy and cross through different dimensions – traveling faster than the speed of light. It’s the kind of thing space-obsessed kids (and adults, alike) dream about. We dedicate movies, like “2001: A Space Odyssey,” directed […] Continue reading Continue reading

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