Author Archives: hongxisu

Self-Discovery through Literature

A memorable moment that has impacted the course of my life is when I attended my first assembly in elementary school as a transfer student. I watched as the teachers announced the student with the most Star Reader points, and a girl stands up to accept her five hundred point tag. The Star Reader brag […] Continue reading

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Disabling the Normal Body in William Blake’s Poetry And Art

In my paper, I argue that William Blake challenges the notion of the normal body by disabling the contraries of the disabled body and the normal body through the contrast of All Religions are One with Sir Joshua Reynolds’ Discourses on Art in order to advance the disability discourse during his time in the Age of […] Continue reading

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Self-Annihilation of the Material Constructs and the Reconnection with Nature

Through examining the concluding illustration in William Blake’s Milton, I argue that the role of humans in the Last Judgement is the self-annihilation of the material self, and a reconnection with nature. The illustration demonstrates three abnormal human figures that represent the reconnection with nature. The figures on the left and right are resemblant of […] Continue reading

Posted in material world, nature, self-annhilation, The Last Judgment (11/6-11/13) | Comments Off on Self-Annihilation of the Material Constructs and the Reconnection with Nature

William Blake and Enlightenment Media 2019-11-06 14:29:10

In Priscilla Ortega’s post, she argues that Milton’s self annihilation and eternal death is required to detach from the ideologies of the material world and to reconstruct oneself. This illustration supports her argument through the quote on the bottom, “To Annihilate the Self-hood of Deceit & False Forgiveness.” The Deceit and False Forgiveness is an […] Continue reading

Posted in The Last Judgment (11/6-11/13) | Comments Off on William Blake and Enlightenment Media 2019-11-06 14:29:10

Eternal Salvation through the Eternal Death of Selfhood

In William Blake’s Milton, Milton goes down to “self annihilation and eternal death” (Pl 15, ln 22) to attain eternal salvation. In the conclusion of the introduction in the first book, the narrator states, “mark well my words! they are of your eternal salvation” (Pl 2, ln 24). In other words, the story illustrated is […] Continue reading

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Good or Evil or Good and Evil

I argue that in the conclusion of William Blake’s “Asia” in The Song of Los, Urizen’s weeping represents his remorse for the injustices he commited against humanity. In “Asia,” Urizen is flying over Europe when his “Books of brass iron & gold / Melted over the land as he flew” (Plate 7, line 14-15; p. […] Continue reading

Posted in Milton's Satan, Repentance, The Song of Los, Urizen's Tears (10/30), William Blake | Comments Off on Good or Evil or Good and Evil

Revolution through Poetry

In Plates 17 and 18, lines 37-39, 1-11 (p. 106), why does Los prepare for epic war along with Orc, who arrives with “furious terrors” and “golden chariots”? Explain the significance of this cosmic battle for Blake’s prophetic vision of Europe. In Europe A Prophecy, William Blake uses the character’s representation to demonstrate his perspective […] Continue reading

Posted in Europe a Prophecy, French Revolution, Poetic Genius, poetry, The Flames of Orc (10/23), William Blake | Comments Off on Revolution through Poetry

The Practicing of Herz-Lev

After reading, “Young William Blake and the Moravian Tradition of Visionary Art” by Marsha Schuchard, the Moravian influence in William Blake’s works are understandable. From Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, “The worship of God is. Honouring his gifts in other men each according to his genius. and loving the greatest men best, those who […] Continue reading

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Meaning is Created through Opposites

“Prisons are built with stones of Law, Brothels with bricks of Religion.” The proverb compares the consequences of Law and Religion. In the first half, the stones are being compared to the Law. The stones that construct the prison is what physically prevents the prisoners from leaving. However, the Law is the abstraction that contains […] Continue reading

Posted in law, meaning, Proverbs of Hell, Proverbs of Hell (9/25), Religion, truth, William Blake | Comments Off on Meaning is Created through Opposites

The Impoverished Flowers of London

  In The Songs of Innocence and of Experience by William Blake, the poem “Holy Thursday” is in both collections, presenting a stark contrast that informs the conditions of impoverish children in London. “Holy Thursday” from The Songs of Innocence illustrates the external perspective of these children of poverty. The poem introduces the children as “innocent […] Continue reading

Posted in children, Experience, Earth, and Adulthood (9/18), poverty, Religion, Wiliiam Blake | Comments Off on The Impoverished Flowers of London