Author Archives: Kylie Korsnack

Music, Langauge, and A Non-tradiational Collaboration

When I began the semester, I was interested in the way I saw music functioning in contemporary speculative fiction as a sort of language or communication tool that could transcend traditionally static boundaries, so I wanted to learn more about the re… Continue reading

Posted in Cognitive Studies, interdisciplinary, language, music, Music and the Mind, music cognition, neuroscience, Vanderbilt University | Comments Off on Music, Langauge, and A Non-tradiational Collaboration

Natural or Unnatural Selection?: Darwin and the evolutionary success of genetically engineered species in Bacigalupi’s Windup Girl

“Emiko doesn’t meet his gaze, looks out instead at the circling cats amongst the diners. ‘Generippers learned too much from cheshires” (114). `~ Paolo Bacigalupi, The Windup Girl I recently heard an undergraduate biomedical eng… Continue reading

Posted in biomedicine, Darwin, dystopia, evolution, Science Fiction | Comments Off on Natural or Unnatural Selection?: Darwin and the evolutionary success of genetically engineered species in Bacigalupi’s Windup Girl

Education, Nanotechnology, and the Magic School Bus?: Rethinking the relationship between science and science-fiction

“Who, then, are the real ‘engineers of the future’?” -Colin Milbun, Nanovision In Nanovision, Colin Milburn explores the way in which scientific discourse and the generic conventions of science-fiction blur in the study of nanotechnology. Inde… Continue reading

Posted in Colin Milburn, education, humanities, Magic School Bus, N. Katherine Hayles, nanotechnology, Nanovision, popular science, science, Science Education, Science Fiction, technology, technoscience | Comments Off on Education, Nanotechnology, and the Magic School Bus?: Rethinking the relationship between science and science-fiction

Homo Sacer and the State of Exception in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake

~”The birth of the camp in our time appears as an event that decisively signals the political space of modernity itself”–Giorgio Agamben, Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life. In the introduction to Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power a… Continue reading

Posted in bare life, biopolitics, camp, Cary Wolfe, Giorgio Agamben, history of science, Homo Sacer, Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake, sovereignty | Comments Off on Homo Sacer and the State of Exception in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake

Social Evolution?: Thinking through evolution in Wells’ The Time Machine and The Island of Dr. Moreau

In both The Time Machine and The Island of Dr. Moreau, H.G. Wells uses narrative to think about aspects of theories of natural selection and evolution that he finds problematic. In his essay “Human Evolution, an Artificial Process,” Wells, argues t… Continue reading

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Tweeting from “the Cage”?: Applying Henry James’ Technological Critique to the 21st Century

“It had occurred to her early that in her position—that of a young person spending, in framed and wired confinement, the life of a guinea-pig or a magpie—she should know a great many persons without their recognizing the acquaintance”—so begi… Continue reading

Posted in "social media, 19th Century, Henry James, history of science, In the Cage, Jack Dorsey, technology, twitter | Comments Off on Tweeting from “the Cage”?: Applying Henry James’ Technological Critique to the 21st Century

A Louse-y Holiday: Cavendish, Hooke, and the History of Scientific Objectivity

Christmas 2014 will forever be remembered by my family as: The Christmas of the Louse. Yep. Louse or better known by it’s plural form (because there is never just one) Lice. Imagine this: after a weekend filled with the joys of experiencing Christmas… Continue reading

Posted in 17th Century, 18th century, 19th Century, 20th Century, Christmas, experimental philosophy, history of science, Lice, Lice Humor, Louse, Margaret Cavendish, Micrographia, microscopic science, objectivity, Observations upon Experimental Philosophy, Robert Hooke, scientific objectivity | Comments Off on A Louse-y Holiday: Cavendish, Hooke, and the History of Scientific Objectivity