Author Archives: melissascharles

The Tension of Time

  I wrote my last blog post on the structure of “Cloud Atlas”. The story jumps in time, setting, and cast of characters. The stories overlap and carry themes over a very long period of time. Since “Cloud Atlas”, we have read and discussed James Watson’s “The Double Helix”, Ian McEwan’s “Saturday”, and Margaret Atwood’s […] Continue reading

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The Genetic Plot

The first five sections of David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas showcase an eclectic formats. Readers are enveloped into a close first person journal, privy to letter correspondences and interview transcriptions, and pulled along in suspense-filled mysteries. Some formats allow more insight into a characters motives than others. Across the styles, characters are mercilessly driven to their […] Continue reading

Posted in Cloud Atlas, Double Helix, free will, genetic determinism, genetic engineering, Science and humanities, Science Fiction | Comments Off on The Genetic Plot

The Inevitable God-Complex

Michael Bay’s 2005 film The Island had several scenes straight out of the action movie handbook. While watching the movie, I looked away for 30 second of a chase scene and looked back to find the protagonists perched on letters on a skyscraper. Tried and true hooks like this surely helped the film pull in […] Continue reading

Posted in Cloning, genetic engineering, God-Complex, Never Let Me Go, science and ethics, Science and humanities, Science Fiction, the island | Comments Off on The Inevitable God-Complex

The Transcription of Science Fiction

Last semester, my gender studies class read and analyzed The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, an author I’ll continue to read in Genetics and Literature. Our discussion centered around the notion of prediction. Atwood argued that her work was not meant to serve as a forecast for society; she meant it only as imaginative, speculative […] Continue reading

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Genetics and Literature 2014-01-12 18:52:52

Introductions are my favorite thing to write. At the start of the intro, structure is less rigid. An author can do whatever it takes to get the readers hooked. Then suddenly, it’s the thesis, and the preview of everything I have to say. By this point, the reader is hooked and dragged into the slew […] Continue reading

Posted in Double Helix, Ethics of science, genetic determinism, Science and humanities | Comments Off on Genetics and Literature 2014-01-12 18:52:52