Author Archives: osmanrh

The Debate of Privacy Among Different Generations

“Teens will regularly share things widely on Facebook simply because they see no reason to make the effort to make those pieces of content private” (Boyd 62). In Chapter 2 in Boyd’s novel, I find this quote to be very relatable. While I do not consider myself an active poster on Facebook, this applies to […] Continue reading

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Review of Vox Ex Machina

The episode of this Podcast was very interesting and managed to keep my attention for the duration of it. It utilized multiple voices along with different people to help explain different ideas in order to prevent one voice from becoming too monotoned. In addition, the podcast used upbeat music at times to illustrate examples which […] Continue reading

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The Carelessness of Repetition

While Enigma appeared unbreakable to the world, it was only a matter of time before a weakness would be discovered. This weakness occurred due to the laziness and tiny errors of the German workers. As a result, the Allied powers exploited this weakness and were able to win the war. The laziness that allowed for […] Continue reading

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The Need to Establish a Common Ground

When the 9/11 attacks occurred on American soil, the government had to respond in a certain manner to ensure the safety of its people. Based off of an argument brought up by Cory Doctorow in his novel Little Brother, I agree that the government first has to protect the safety of all citizens above anything else. […] Continue reading

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Diffusion of Knowledge and Awareness

In the time of Mary Queen of Scotts, Mary, her conspirators and others trusted the encrypted messages would remain secret, trusted the difficulty of their key, and trusted the inability of others to decipher coded messages. Even though they were not aware that their trust ended in Mary Queen of Scotts death sentence, it was […] Continue reading

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Our Dependence on the Bill of Rights

The Bill of Rights continues to stand to defend our individual rights within the United States. In Doctrow’s “Little Brother” these individual liberties are compromised when a bombing attack occurs in the town. As security in the town of the novel saw a severe increase, privacy rights were jeopardized as a result. In Marcus’s history class, […] Continue reading

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Are You Going to Let Fear Infringe Upon Your Right to Privacy?

The idea of uncertainty has left people in a frenzy for ages. However, with the improvements seen in technology we have begun to uncover what had previously been unknown to us. Morris, in his essay “Mining Student Data Could Save Lives”, highlights the ability to limit undetected campus violence through the use of data mining. […] Continue reading

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Mary Queen of Scots’s and Babington’s Ignorance in Assuming Security

Imprisoned for 18 years in England, Mary Queen of Scots welcomed the idea for a plan to escape the prison cell. However, as the plan was developed through writing, the use of an encryption system, even if it was weak, provided Queen Mary and Babington with a sense of security that prompted them to outlines all […] Continue reading

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