Author Archives: ragieleg

Surveillance Must Be Reined In

The privacy of American citizens should be prioritized over government surveillance efforts, even in the interests of national security. First, the right to privacy is an unalienable right that goes in tandem with, or could even be seen as the obvious and necessary inverse of, the right to free speech. Even if American’s don’t realize […] Continue reading

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The Gilded Age of Surveillance Capitalism

One phrase that Chris Gilliard used in the Leading Lines podcast that really stuck out to me, presumably because I had never heard it before, was his use of the term “surveillance capitalism.” In the podcast he was using it to compare how colleges and universities have borrowed, in his words, “some of the worst […] Continue reading

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Having Something to Hide in the Social Media Age

“she has started creating a ‘light version’ of her life that she’ll regularly share on Facebook just so that her friends don’t pester her about what’s actually happening. Much to her frustration, she finds that sharing at least a little bit affords her more privacy than sharing nothing at all.” (Boyd 74). In this social-media […] Continue reading

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What Singh Couldn’t Have Predicted

Simon Singh makes many predictions about evident trends in the increasingly digital world. 20 years later, he got a lot of things right, although from our digitally oversaturated viewpoint, they seem obvious now.  Singh was definitely correct in his prediction that soon email would overtake normal mail, and this rang true for the early 2000s […] Continue reading

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Alice, Bob, and Impressive Dedication

As we’ve discussed at length in this course—the history of cryptography is riddled with instances of problems that at first glance seem immutable. The issue of key distribution was one of these supposedly immutable doctrines of secret writing. However, as we have also seen—the history of cryptography is also riddled with people so determined to […] Continue reading

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The Secret Struggles of WWII’s Female Codebreakers

Although female codebreakers were completing some of the most important work on the intelligence front during World War II, the necessary secrecy of their work as well as their gender led these women to not always receive the treatment that they deserved. In the 1940s women in general were seen as subordinate to men, and […] Continue reading

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Podcast Building: Substance and Style

  In the Zodiac Killer episode from the One Time Pod, the podcast creator kept her audience engaged both through stylistic aspects and an interesting topic. I particularly enjoyed the use of ominous background music that changed as the speaker told the story to build the mood—it was also just the perfect sound level so […] Continue reading

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All is Fair in Love and War

In The Code Book, Simon Singh details the codebreaking successes of the British military during World War I–successes that often needed to be kept secret and prevented the spread of some important, yet sensitive information during the war. One such piece of critical information was the Zimmerman telegram. While some may think it completely unethical […] Continue reading

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Too Many Eyes to Fit in the Panopticon’s Tower

I would agree with Walker’s claim that the Panopticon is not an accurate metaphor for the average human’s interaction with surveillance today. While it could be argued that the government does watch over us and large corporations do silently collect our data, most people are not aware of this and thus it does not enact […] Continue reading

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Prying Telephone Operators and Free Radio Waves: Implications of New Tech on Secure Messages

Because the onset of the telegraph inserted a middleman in the communication of a sender and receiver, messages not meant for prying eyes understandably needed to be encrypted with a more secure cipher like the Vigenère cipher. Since the invention of the telegraph in the 19thcentury, several other inventions or innovations in the world of […] Continue reading

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