Author Archives: Ross Koppel

The More I Learn, the Less I Know

Ross Koppel Dr. Garcia English 190 2 May 2018 I transferred to this institution after more than a few years as a part-time community college student. The transition was not easy, but I had the wonderful experience of taking almost exclusively classes in my field after becoming a full-time student. To condense what I have […] Continue reading

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Orality in Blake’s Milton

The two plates below depicting oral sex show oral sex between two unidentified individuals. The first plate shows oral sex as a form of domination. The woman is slumped over, as though unconscious. One hand supports herself on the man’s shoulder. The other is limp. The man pulls her close, entwining his arms around her. […] Continue reading

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The Eternal and Infinite Death

I tried to resist the Vortex and now I am caught. In Blake’s Milton A Poem Book 1, Milton seeks to prepare himself for judgement. Whether his preparation is the eternity of death or the infinite of the vortex, Judgement comes, and with it eternity. Milton speaks, “I will go down to self annihilation and eternal death, […] Continue reading

Posted in death, infinity, life, Self-annihilation, The Last Judgment (11/6-11/13), vortex | Comments Off on The Eternal and Infinite Death

Urizen, The Twice Weeped

Urizen weeps twice in The Song of Los: once near the end of “Africa,” and once at the end of “Asia.” In “Africa,” Urizen weeps for his mission is nearing completion. In “Asia,” Urizen weeps for his mission is nearing failure. In “Africa,” it is said that a new philosophy of the world is approaching. […] Continue reading

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From what Mythology is Europe A Prophecy derived?

Not to become a one-trick pony here, but in Europe a Prophecy, Blake’s mythopoeia becomes once again very Nordic. These apocalyptic prophecies bear close resemblance to Ragnarök, the apocalyptic prophecies of Norse Mythology. Because the Eddas of Medieval Norse people are incredibly difficult to read, I will be citing Neil Gaiman’s well researched, modernized 2017 edition: Norse Mythology […] Continue reading

Posted in prophecy, Ragnarok, The Flames of Orc (3/14), William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on From what Mythology is Europe A Prophecy derived?

The Poetic Genius and Skáldskaparmál

William Blake’s marginalia to An Apology for the Bible finally gives me textual evidence to say: The Poetic Genius is rooted in Norse Mythology. I know that doesn’t in any way answer the question “Where do we see Swedenborgian-Moravian Christianity in Blake’s works,” but I’m here to tell you that when it comes to the Poetic […] Continue reading

Posted in Empire vs. Revolution (2/28), norse mythology, odin, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on The Poetic Genius and Skáldskaparmál

Gadzooks! Leviathan’s Wounds!

Moravian tradition features frequent sexual imagery, and this is comparable to Blake’s rather horrifying description of the Leviathan’s mouth. It is all incredibly strange. A large portion of Moravian theology focuses on the wounds of Christ. These include the wounds of circumcision and the wound of the spear in the rib. These wounds are highly […] Continue reading

Posted in Christ and the Body (9/25), Marriage of Heaven and Hell, phallic imagery, William Blake | Comments Off on Gadzooks! Leviathan’s Wounds!

Narration or Proverb?

The Proverbs of Hell are presented as cultural artifacts brought back from a trip to the pit. The final line blurs the line between the genre of cultural artifact and the genre of belief. The speaker of The Marriage of Heaven and Hell is a rather confusing one. The narrator questions the Bible, Paradise Lost, and […] Continue reading

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The Optimist’s God and the Pessimist’s Religion.

In two poems, William Blake shows how God creates Hope, but religion creates despair. In William Blake’s The Songs of Innocence and Experience, I believe there are two poems that are linked by a loose thread. To find the link, one must employ equal parts close reading skill, knowledge of the historical cultural moment, and mental gymnastics. […] Continue reading

Posted in Blake, Chimney Sweeper, Experience, Earth, and Adulthood (2/7), God, Religion | Comments Off on The Optimist’s God and the Pessimist’s Religion.

An Exodus from Reynolds

The phrase “Israel deliverd from Egypt is Art deliverd from Nature & Imitation” (352) is prefaced with the inscription “Spiritual War” (352). This preface, a preface of “Spiritual War,” seems to serve to remind the viewer that the very nature of art, to Blake, is spiritual and deeply religious, and the idea that art can […] Continue reading

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