Author Archives: sarilc

Thoughts on Interdisciplinarity, Cognitive Science, and 19th-Century Aesthetics

Interdisciplinary is an at times seemingly vague buzzword invoked in academia. It is often used in general documents like Vanderbilt’s academic strategic plan. Recently, however, it has become a little less of an abstract concept for me. I have spent… Continue reading

Posted in 19th-century aesthetics, cognitive science, Cognitive Studies, Daniel Levin, disciplines, history of science, interdisciplinary, Levin Lab, perception, Vanderbilt University, visual perception, Visuality | Comments Off on Thoughts on Interdisciplinarity, Cognitive Science, and 19th-Century Aesthetics

Leaping Across Evolutionary Niches in The Windup Girl

In his science fiction novel The Windup Girl, Paolo Bacigalupi imagines a world in which certain types of genetic information have become scarce commodities, tracked down by the intrigues of global companies and hoarded in top-security seedbanks. Genet… Continue reading

Posted in Darwin, evolution, genetics, niche, Origin of Species, Paolo Bacigalupi, Science Fiction, The Windup Girl | Comments Off on Leaping Across Evolutionary Niches in The Windup Girl

The Dissolution of Worlds

In his introduction to Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World (2013), Timothy Morton defines hyperobjects as “things that are massively distributed in time and space relative to humans,” one example being “the whirring ma… Continue reading

Posted in ascendancy, Cloud Atlas, David Mitchell, dissolution of worlds, human identity, Hyperobjects, Mitchell, David, Science Fiction, Timothy Morton | Comments Off on The Dissolution of Worlds

The Voice in His Head

One of the recurring features of Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake is the voice that keeps speaking in Snowman’s head, a voice whose tone is by turns condescending, instructional, pious, courageous, scolding, childish, and much else. The voice speak… Continue reading

Posted in Atwood, Margaret, biopolitics, Giorgio Agamben, Homo Sacer, language, Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, voice | Comments Off on The Voice in His Head

Flashing a Glimpse of the Underworld

At a crucial turning point in H. G. Wells’ The Time Machine (1895), the time traveler, having descended one of the Morlock wells “ill equipped” and “even without enough matches,” wishes he had brought, not a torch or a weapon, but a camera: Continue reading

Posted in evolution, flash photography, H.G. Wells, history of science, Jacob Riis, Science Fiction, The Island of Dr. Moreau, The Time Machine, Wells, H. G. | Comments Off on Flashing a Glimpse of the Underworld

Telegraphic Realism and Modernist Aesthetics

Henry James’ style of writing in his short novel In the Cage at first seems nothing like the compressed, imagist ideals of Ezra Pound. But perhaps examining some of Pound’s essays, including one on James, in conjunction with Richard Menke’s exami… Continue reading

Posted in Ezra Pound, Henry James, Imagism, In the Cage, Interiority, James, Henry, modernism, Richard Menke, technology, Telegraphic Realism, Visuality | Comments Off on Telegraphic Realism and Modernist Aesthetics

Objectivity and the Persona of the Artist

One of the recurrent images considered in Daston and Galison’s book Objectivity is that of the artist in contrast with the scientist. The most extensive discussion of this relation comes in chapter two, where generally in the eighteenth century, “t… Continue reading

Posted in artists, Cognitive Studies, Enlightenment, history of science, intuition, modernism, nineteenth century, objectivity, reason, Scientists, Selfhood, sensation, subjectivity, Visuality | Comments Off on Objectivity and the Persona of the Artist