Author Archives: schrokr1

Getting Our Priorities Straight

Almost everyone agrees that safety and privacy are two things that people have the fundamental right to enjoy.  Rarely do we hear an argument deliberately stating that either of these concepts should be intentionally disregarded.  In a perfect world, everyone could feel protected from physical harm as well as from privacy invasion.  Unfortunately, however, we […] Continue reading

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The Thoughtful Production of the RadioLab Podcast

The producers of the RadioLab podcast episodes, “Darkode” and “Ceremony,” implemented several elements in order to make the material more interesting and engaging.  First of all, the introductions did a good job grabbing the attention of the audience, with unique sound editing techniques.  Furthermore, the producers continued to add immersive sound effects throughout the duration […] Continue reading

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Communicating in Plain Sight

One passage from It’s Complicated by danah boyd that caught my attention was, “Many teens are happy to publicly perform their social dramas for their classmates and acquaintances, provided that only those in the know will actually understand what’s really going on and those who shouldn’t be involved are socially isolated from knowing what’s unfolding. […] Continue reading

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The Question of Accountability

On page 315, Singh writes that Zimmerman, through a friend, “simply installed [PGP] on an American computer, which happened to be connected to the Internet. After that, a hostile regime may or may not have downloaded it.”  Although Zimmerman’s actions possibly enabled criminals to gain access to better encryption, he should not be held accountable […] Continue reading

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Takeaways From an Engaging Podcast

One of the podcast episodes I chose to listen to was “Numbers Stations” from 99% Invisible.  The episode is hosted by Roman Mars, who discusses mysterious shortwave radio frequencies used to broadcast endless strings of numbers, also known as numbers stations.  Something I found very interesting about this topic was the degree of mystery and […] Continue reading

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How Far Can Motivation Take You?

In the post titled “The Allies Work Better Under Pressure,” the author argues that the Allied success in breaking the Enigma cipher was in large part due to the pressure to defend against the German offensive.   He says that the threat of invasion and loss of lives motivated the Allies to put more of their […] Continue reading

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Why Some Intel Should Remain Secret

Prior to the publication of Winston Churchill’s The World Crisis and the British Royal Navy’s official history of the First World War in 1923, the Germans were completely oblivious to the fact that their encryption system had been compromised.  Since Admiral Hall managed to make it seem as though the unencrypted version of the Zimmermann Telegram […] Continue reading

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The Fine Line Between Surveillance and Privacy Invasion

The Newseum display encourages people to consider the issue of privacy versus security and asks us what we would be willing to give up to feel safe.  There are many interesting responses on the whiteboard underneath the display, but the one that stood out to me the most was the Ben Franklin quote, which reads, […] Continue reading

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The Cipher That Survived for 200 Years

The Great Cipher of King Louis XIV was an enhanced monoalphabetic substitution cipher that managed to remain unsolved for over two centuries.  It was developed by the father-and-son team of Antoine and Bonaventure Rossignol, two of the best cryptanalysts in France.  King Louis XIV used it to securely encrypt sensitive information regarding his political plans.  […] Continue reading

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The Paradox of the False Positive

One passage from Little Brother that particularly caught my attention was the part from chapter 8 in which Marcus discusses the paradox of the false positive.  It begins with Marcus explaining his plan to fight back against the Department of Homeland Security’s ramped-up surveillance and “safety protocols” that he believes to be violating the personal privacy […] Continue reading

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