Author Archives: Wendy Gutierrez

Wolf in Knight’s Armor: Civility in “Holy Thursday”

The contrasting levels of power present harmoniously in “Holy Thursday” from Songs of Innocence, like the children, beadles, and God in St. John’s Cathedral, illustrates the exertion of false power Thomas Paine and William Blake’s Moravian beliefs rejected. This civility with which the scene in “Holy Thursday” is conducted with demonstrates the way  civility fosters social hierarchies and […] Continue reading

Posted in chivalry, civility, Empire vs. Revolution (10/16), Holy Thursday, innocence, The Rights of Man, Thomas Paine, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Wolf in Knight’s Armor: Civility in “Holy Thursday”

The Procreation and Rebirth of the Sinner

The Morovian teachings Blake was exposed to had an emphasized the production of knowledge, and in turn life, through bodily means. According to Marsha Keith Schuchard in “Young William Blake and the Moravian Tradition of Visionary Art,” Morovians believed “new souls [are] birthed [from] the gushing blood” of Jesus’ crucifixion wounds, since the phallic nails penetrate the […] Continue reading

Posted in birth, body, Christ and the Body (10/2), Leviathan, phallic imagery, sex, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on The Procreation and Rebirth of the Sinner

Growing Knowledge

William Blake’s “Proverbs of Hell” aims to demonstrate the importance of questioning accepted social ideals, as it is the only manner by which new knowledge can be produced. One aphorism that especially stood out to me was the second line: “Drive your cart and your plow over the bones of the dead.” The tools in […] Continue reading

Posted in ideologies, knowledge, Proverbs of Hell, Proverbs of Hell (9/25), questioning, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Growing Knowledge

God’s (Innocent) Kids Aren’t Alright

My arrangement of the plates from William Blake’s Songs of Innocence aimed at recounting the observations and reflections of an omniscient narrator/onlooker. Through the my selections I formed a narrative that questions the effectiveness of religious faith as a form of personal and social governance. The poems I chose were “Holy Thursday,” “The Chimney Sweep,” and “On […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Holy Thursday, Innocence, Eden, and Childhood (9/11), On Anothers Sorrow, Poetic Genius, Religion, religious skepticism, Songs of Innocence, the chimney sweeper, William Blake | Comments Off on God’s (Innocent) Kids Aren’t Alright

Poetic Genius: The Artistic Exodus

William Blake’s inscription in “The Laocoon” is used to differentiate his liberating definition of art from Sir Joshua Reynolds. The analogy is a biblical reference to when the Israelites escaped their servitude to the Egyptians. Blake uses this context to call attention to the artificiality of the Nature that Reynolds views as the principle that […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Blake's philosophy of art (9/4), Poetic Genius, Sir Joshua Reynolds, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Poetic Genius: The Artistic Exodus