Author Archives: Wendy Gutierrez

“Objects of Charity”: Capitalist Philanthropy in Songs of Innocence and of Experience

My paper will provide a Marxist analysis of charity schools and how these institutions foster capitalism. The presence of religion in the poems of Songs of Innocence and of Experience makes it easy to overlook the greater social issues that underlie the texts. This paper argues that through the alienation of children characters by religious […] Continue reading

Posted in Capitalism, Holy Thursday, Research Abstracts (11/20), Songs of Innocence and Experience, the chimney sweeper, Uncategorized (you sucker!), William Blake | Comments Off on “Objects of Charity”: Capitalist Philanthropy in Songs of Innocence and of Experience

Love Yourself: Masturbation in “Milton”

Upholding Urizenic reasoning, or Negations, is what keeps contraries as distinct entities rather than parts of a whole. It is because we divide contraries along the the lines of reason that they are seen as separate. As a result,  only by breaking the “mind-forged manacles” of Negation can a body be fulfilled in all sensations […] Continue reading

Posted in contrary, masturbation, Milton, negation, The Last Judgment (11/6-11/13), William Blake | Comments Off on Love Yourself: Masturbation in “Milton”

Artistic Excitement and Production

In regards to Jose’s post, “Milton Beyond the Grave,” I think his claim that Milton’s annihilation is necessary to inspire other artists could be further elevated with an analysis of Plate 3, which accompanies his chosen passage. The excitement and inspiration Milton brings up in artists is depicted in the excitement occurring in the illustration, […] Continue reading

Posted in Milton, sex, The Last Judgment (11/6-11/13), Uncategorized (you sucker!), William Blake | Comments Off on Artistic Excitement and Production

Mortal Milton and Self-Annihilation

In Plate 15 of Blake’s Milton, Milton needs to “go down to self annihilation and eternal death” (Pl 15, ln 22) to revert back to human and fight against his Selfhood. Selfhood in this text can be characterized as “prideful self-righteousness” (Blake’s Poetry and Designs 145) that is intensified when one’s ideas are worshipped and taken as law. […] Continue reading

Posted in Milton, Self-annihilation, The Last Judgment (11/6-11/13), Uncategorized (you sucker!), William Blake | Comments Off on Mortal Milton and Self-Annihilation

Beyond Urizen: Breaking the “Philosophy of Five Senses”

Urizen’s tears at the end of “Asia” in The Song of Los are the result of his failure to preserve his strict, limiting dominion on the world, rather than remorse for his actions. To maintain the laws that bind humans to reason, he bestows a “Philosophy of Five Senses… into the hands of Newton & […] Continue reading

Posted in Asia, Enlightenment, scientific method, The Song of Los, Urizen, Urizen's Tears (10/30), William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Beyond Urizen: Breaking the “Philosophy of Five Senses”

The “Female Dream” and Social Stagnation

As the central component of William Blake’s Europe: A Prophecy, Enitharmon dream and its characterization as a “female dream” is significant in demonstrating the impact of female energy on revolution. Enitharmon is identified as the “source of female sexual pleasure” (Europe Summary) and of “Spiritual Beauty.” Blake’s view of Enitharmon reminded me of Mary Wollstonecraft’s […] Continue reading

Posted in "female dream", A Vindication on the Rights of Women, Enitharmon, Europe a Prophecy, Mary Wollstonecraft, repression, The Flames of Orc (10/23), William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on The “Female Dream” and Social Stagnation

Wolf in Knight’s Armor: Civility in “Holy Thursday”

The contrasting levels of power present harmoniously in “Holy Thursday” from Songs of Innocence, like the children, beadles, and God in St. John’s Cathedral, illustrates the exertion of false power Thomas Paine and William Blake’s Moravian beliefs rejected. This civility with which the scene in “Holy Thursday” is conducted with demonstrates the way  civility fosters social hierarchies and […] Continue reading

Posted in chivalry, civility, Empire vs. Revolution (10/16), Holy Thursday, innocence, The Rights of Man, Thomas Paine, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Wolf in Knight’s Armor: Civility in “Holy Thursday”

The Procreation and Rebirth of the Sinner

The Morovian teachings Blake was exposed to had an emphasized the production of knowledge, and in turn life, through bodily means. According to Marsha Keith Schuchard in “Young William Blake and the Moravian Tradition of Visionary Art,” Morovians believed “new souls [are] birthed [from] the gushing blood” of Jesus’ crucifixion wounds, since the phallic nails penetrate the […] Continue reading

Posted in birth, body, Christ and the Body (10/2), Leviathan, phallic imagery, sex, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on The Procreation and Rebirth of the Sinner

Growing Knowledge

William Blake’s “Proverbs of Hell” aims to demonstrate the importance of questioning accepted social ideals, as it is the only manner by which new knowledge can be produced. One aphorism that especially stood out to me was the second line: “Drive your cart and your plow over the bones of the dead.” The tools in […] Continue reading

Posted in ideologies, knowledge, Proverbs of Hell, Proverbs of Hell (9/25), questioning, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Growing Knowledge

God’s (Innocent) Kids Aren’t Alright

My arrangement of the plates from William Blake’s Songs of Innocence aimed at recounting the observations and reflections of an omniscient narrator/onlooker. Through the my selections I formed a narrative that questions the effectiveness of religious faith as a form of personal and social governance. The poems I chose were “Holy Thursday,” “The Chimney Sweep,” and “On […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Holy Thursday, Innocence, Eden, and Childhood (9/11), On Anothers Sorrow, Poetic Genius, Religion, religious skepticism, Songs of Innocence, the chimney sweeper, William Blake | Comments Off on God’s (Innocent) Kids Aren’t Alright