Author Archives: yanofssm

The “F” Word

Our class discussion last week about getting people to care about feminism really stuck with me. It seems that the word “feminism” has become almost a dirty word in our vocabulary–the word has so many negative connotations and myths surrounding … Continue reading Continue reading

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Rigid Lines

The idea of “queer time” really opened my eyes to the box we put ourselves in when we watch TV. Both the linear projection of time and the gender binary put us rigidly in either black or white–man or woman, … Continue reading Continue reading

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The “Strong” Female Roles of Reese Witherspoon

For my final project, I will be looking at Reese Witherspoon’s various roles as a female protagonist. I will be discussing Cruel Intentions, made in 1999 (she plays Annette Hargrove, innocent declared virgin who wins over the sexually promiscuous characters … Continue reading Continue reading

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Why We Love Lisbeth

When we went around the room this week naming our favorite character from “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest,” Lisbeth definitely won the popularity vote. This got me thinking, what is it about her that makes us support her … Continue reading Continue reading

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Mise-en-abyme in All About My Mother

All About My Mother is characterized by a clear story-within-a-story set up; A Streetcar Named Desire is a running thread that weaves itself throughout the movie, showing the same scenes over and over at various points in the plot. The … Continue reading Continue reading

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Since When Did Drag Equal Wanting to Fit in?

Dorian Corey says in the documentary, Paris is Burning, that “looking like” can be more than just the performance of a character, but can turn into really being the character you are trying to portray, such as trying to pass … Continue reading Continue reading

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Strong Female Roles of Reese Witherspoon

Reese Witherspoon has played several strong female roles where she gets what she wants, leading us to ask, what is Hollywood’s portrayal of the active female? Does she always have a man helping her? Does she step on other people … Continue reading Continue reading

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How to Approach the Character of Megan

The way we are supposed to relate to the protagonist, Megan, in But I’m a Cheerleader is difficult to figure out. Are we meant to identify with her, or pity her as a victim? Should we believe that she truly … Continue reading Continue reading

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What is Said and not Said

One of the most fascinating aspects of Bound is its way of playing with language.  The use of double entendre reflects the hidden sexuality that is going on between the women.  I could even say that this sexuality is “bound” … Continue reading Continue reading

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Man as an Observer, Woman as an Identifier

When a person watches a film, the relationship that they have to society and the messages portrayed on film affect why they are watching, whom they are watching, and how they are watching. In both Laura Mulvey’s essay “Visual Pleasure … Continue reading Continue reading

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