Author Archives: Warner Miller

Moral Science: Reconciling Science and Religion in Stem Cell Research

It is no secret that science and religion often come into conflict, but even in areas where the strife seems most irreconcilable and most steadfast in moral convictions, there is in fact great hope for reconciliation. Stem cell research, especially … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Papers on Stem Cell Research and Cloning | Comments Off on Moral Science: Reconciling Science and Religion in Stem Cell Research

Thanks to Dr. Lawrence

Thank you very much for your presentation in class last week! As a student not particularly knowledgeable about science, and facing an essay on the intricacies of stem cell research, I found your presentation extremely helpful. I am sure you must … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Thank you, Dr. Lawrence: Talk on Stem Cells | Comments Off on Thanks to Dr. Lawrence

Thanks to Dr. Goldfarb

Thank you, Dr. Goldfarb, for visiting our class and allowing us to satisfy curiosity on the subject of intelligent mechatronics. We have been discussing thoroughly the limitations of humanity, but often from a philosophical or psychological angle. It was fascinating … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Vanderbilt University Center for Intelligent Mechatronics | Comments Off on Thanks to Dr. Goldfarb

Lost is Listlessness: Büchner’s “Leonce and Lena” as a Tragicomedy of Human Psychology

Can laughter ever cause sadness? Can sadness ever produce laughter? “Leonce and Lena,” a play by Georg Büchner, seamlessly weaves comedy within a tragedy, and tragedy within a comedy. This tragicomedy masterfully captures a portrait of a wandering soul in … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Buechner, News | Comments Off on Lost is Listlessness: Büchner’s “Leonce and Lena” as a Tragicomedy of Human Psychology

Innocence Incarnate: the Natural and the Artificial in Kleist’s “Ordeal by Fire”

The human species often likes to distinguish itself from the animal world by rejecting dependence on natura land instinctive forces, though we also find writers who belong to a movement that calls for a return to and appreciation of the … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Kleist's Ordeal by Fire - Essays | Comments Off on Innocence Incarnate: the Natural and the Artificial in Kleist’s “Ordeal by Fire”

Laughing at Self-Automization

Charlie Chaplin’s satirization of the automization of American society in the early 2oth century is achieved through physical humor, which serves as a subtle yet effective portrayal of a common fear of the era.
Continue reading

Posted in Charlie Chaplin: "Modern Times" - Thesis Statements | Comments Off on Laughing at Self-Automization