Category Archives: 20th Century

The “Vanished Children”: Routinized War in Spin and Beyond

In “Air War Prophecy and Interwar Modernism,” Paul K. Saint-Amour posits a “routinization of emergency” and draws upon Lewis Mumford’s The Culture of Cities to describe a “collective psychosis” which was instigated by pre-war anxiety. Sai… Continue reading

Posted in 20th Century, culture, Science Fiction | Comments Off on The “Vanished Children”: Routinized War in Spin and Beyond

De-Sensitizing the Operating Room: Normalizing the “Unnatural” in The Island of Dr. Moreau

I say I became habituated to the Beast People, that a thousand things that had seemed unnatural and repulsive speedily became natural and ordinary to me. (The Island of Dr. Moreau, End of Chapter 15) I used to consider myself a very squeamish person. T… Continue reading

Posted in "victorian literature, 19th Century, 20th Century, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, Ethics of science, H.G. Wells, history of science, role of scientists, Science Fiction, technology, The Island of Dr. Moreau, Visuality | Comments Off on De-Sensitizing the Operating Room: Normalizing the “Unnatural” in The Island of Dr. Moreau

Objectivity, and Other Myths We Tell Ourselves

I come to my literature degree still carrying the baggage of having worked in a hospital operating room for a long time. Maybe it is not surprising to say that I have left filled with images and stories, and I am still trying to find a way of articulat… Continue reading

Posted in 20th Century, biomedicine, history of science, Lorraine Daston, meaning-making, objectivity, Peter Galison, subjectivity, Visuality | Comments Off on Objectivity, and Other Myths We Tell Ourselves

A Louse-y Holiday: Cavendish, Hooke, and the History of Scientific Objectivity

Christmas 2014 will forever be remembered by my family as: The Christmas of the Louse. Yep. Louse or better known by it’s plural form (because there is never just one) Lice. Imagine this: after a weekend filled with the joys of experiencing Christmas… Continue reading

Posted in 17th Century, 18th century, 19th Century, 20th Century, Christmas, experimental philosophy, history of science, Lice, Lice Humor, Louse, Margaret Cavendish, Micrographia, microscopic science, objectivity, Observations upon Experimental Philosophy, Robert Hooke, scientific objectivity | Comments Off on A Louse-y Holiday: Cavendish, Hooke, and the History of Scientific Objectivity

“Servants with Internal Combustion Engines”

Dehumanization seems to be a common motif throughout dystopian novels, from Never Let Me Go’s clone treatments to Oryx and Crake‘s genetic enhancements, and Antic Hay is no exception.  Dan Fang delves deeper into this topic in the following blog post, presenting the strange chimeric inclinations of the citizens of Antic Hay, and how that relates […] Continue reading

Posted in 19th Century, 20th Century, Antic Hay, Eugenics, genetic engineering, JBS Haldane, mechanical servant, object, Posthuman, progress, Science Fiction, scientific advancement, Susan Squier | Comments Off on “Servants with Internal Combustion Engines”