Category Archives: bioethics

Incorrectly Cracking the Code of Life

After watching NOVA’s 2001 special, “Cracking the Code of Life”, which not only explores the superficial characteristics of DNA but also depicts various bioethical issues, I can’t help but be frustrated with the documentary’s depiction of the Lord family. Each of the twin Lord brothers had a son with Tay Sachs, an awful diagnosis for […] Continue reading

Posted in Autism, bioethics, DNA, down's syndrome, Ethics of science, evolution, family, genetic determinism, Genetic discrimination, genetic disorder, genetics, learning disability, missed milestones, NOVA, Science and humanities, Tay Sachs, twins, work force | Comments Off on Incorrectly Cracking the Code of Life

How much can we change? How much should we change?

In “Cracking the Code,” words such as instruction book, blueprint, and manual are used in order to describe a DNA molecule.  The program repeatedly states that the DNA can be “read,” as if it is some sort of book.  One bioethist, George Annas, refers to the DNA molecule as a future diary because the information […] Continue reading

Posted in bioethics, Cracking the code, Gattaca, genetic determinism, genetics, Science and humanities | Comments Off on How much can we change? How much should we change?

Wild Bioassumptions?

In the following article, Killian C Quigley considers the power, potential, and responsibilities that come with the increase of bioscience knowledge. By comparing Huxley’s Brave New World to Nikolas Rose’s The Politics of Life Itself: Biomedicine, Power, and Subjectivity in the Twenty-First Century to Frank Bruni’s Genetic or Not, Gay Won’t Go Away, Quigley offers […] Continue reading

Posted in bioethics, biological determinism, biomedicine, bioscience, Brave New World, Cynthia Nixon, difference, discrimination, Ethics of science, Frank Bruni, gay rights, genetic determinism, genetics, Huxley, laboratory, New York Times, Nikolas Rose, technology | Comments Off on Wild Bioassumptions?

Wild Bioassumptions?

In the following article, Killian C Quigley considers the power, potential, and responsibilities that come with the increase of bioscience knowledge. By comparing Huxley’s Brave New World to Nikolas Rose’s The Politics of Life Itself: Biomedicine, Power, and Subjectivity in the Twenty-First Century to Frank Bruni’s Genetic or Not, Gay Won’t Go Away, Quigley offers […] Continue reading

Posted in bioethics, biological determinism, biomedicine, bioscience, Brave New World, Cynthia Nixon, difference, discrimination, Ethics of science, Frank Bruni, gay rights, genetic determinism, genetics, Huxley, laboratory, New York Times, Nikolas Rose, technology | Comments Off on Wild Bioassumptions?