Category Archives: biomedicine

Natural or Unnatural Selection?: Darwin and the evolutionary success of genetically engineered species in Bacigalupi’s Windup Girl

“Emiko doesn’t meet his gaze, looks out instead at the circling cats amongst the diners. ‘Generippers learned too much from cheshires” (114). `~ Paolo Bacigalupi, The Windup Girl I recently heard an undergraduate biomedical eng… Continue reading

Posted in biomedicine, Darwin, dystopia, evolution, Science Fiction | Comments Off on Natural or Unnatural Selection?: Darwin and the evolutionary success of genetically engineered species in Bacigalupi’s Windup Girl

On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

***This post contains spoilers!  If you are reading this, and you haven’t finished Oryx and Crake, step away from the computer and get back to it!*** I read Oryx and Crake primarily as a novel of trauma, extending past the genocidal crescendo of… Continue reading

Posted in Atwood, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, gender, meaning-making, narrative, narrative structure, Novelists, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, subjectivity | Comments Off on On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

De-Sensitizing the Operating Room: Normalizing the “Unnatural” in The Island of Dr. Moreau

I say I became habituated to the Beast People, that a thousand things that had seemed unnatural and repulsive speedily became natural and ordinary to me. (The Island of Dr. Moreau, End of Chapter 15) I used to consider myself a very squeamish person. T… Continue reading

Posted in "victorian literature, 19th Century, 20th Century, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, Ethics of science, H.G. Wells, history of science, role of scientists, Science Fiction, technology, The Island of Dr. Moreau, Visuality | Comments Off on De-Sensitizing the Operating Room: Normalizing the “Unnatural” in The Island of Dr. Moreau

Objectivity, and Other Myths We Tell Ourselves

I come to my literature degree still carrying the baggage of having worked in a hospital operating room for a long time. Maybe it is not surprising to say that I have left filled with images and stories, and I am still trying to find a way of articulat… Continue reading

Posted in 20th Century, biomedicine, history of science, Lorraine Daston, meaning-making, objectivity, Peter Galison, subjectivity, Visuality | Comments Off on Objectivity, and Other Myths We Tell Ourselves

Wild Bioassumptions?

In the following article, Killian C Quigley considers the power, potential, and responsibilities that come with the increase of bioscience knowledge. By comparing Huxley’s Brave New World to Nikolas Rose’s The Politics of Life Itself: Biomedicine, Power, and Subjectivity in the Twenty-First Century to Frank Bruni’s Genetic or Not, Gay Won’t Go Away, Quigley offers […] Continue reading

Posted in bioethics, biological determinism, biomedicine, bioscience, Brave New World, Cynthia Nixon, difference, discrimination, Ethics of science, Frank Bruni, gay rights, genetic determinism, genetics, Huxley, laboratory, New York Times, Nikolas Rose, technology | Comments Off on Wild Bioassumptions?

Wild Bioassumptions?

In the following article, Killian C Quigley considers the power, potential, and responsibilities that come with the increase of bioscience knowledge. By comparing Huxley’s Brave New World to Nikolas Rose’s The Politics of Life Itself: Biomedicine, Power, and Subjectivity in the Twenty-First Century to Frank Bruni’s Genetic or Not, Gay Won’t Go Away, Quigley offers […] Continue reading

Posted in bioethics, biological determinism, biomedicine, bioscience, Brave New World, Cynthia Nixon, difference, discrimination, Ethics of science, Frank Bruni, gay rights, genetic determinism, genetics, Huxley, laboratory, New York Times, Nikolas Rose, technology | Comments Off on Wild Bioassumptions?