Category Archives: Blake’s philosophy of art (8/28)

Juvenile Progress in Defining Blake’s Poetic Genius

Graffiti art demonstrates the anti-iconoclastic tensions which arise in Sir Joshua Reynold’s critical definition of art. Continue reading

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We have diff definitions of Genius -Blake

“As none by travelling over known lands can find out the unknown, So from already acquired knowledge Man could not acquire more. Therefore an universal Poetic Genius already exists.” -Blake Blake’s perspective on Genius and of art seems to be a very natural one -one that does not require higher forms of schooling.  Perhaps is […] Continue reading

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There are no rules to the genius

Sir Joshua Reynolds argues in Discourse III, “could we teach taste or genius by rules, they would be no longer taste and genius” (44). Which is to say that there is an unnatural, innate power of “taste” and “genius” that cannot be taught–or shouldn’t. That seems to debunk the whole idea of mentor and mentee relationships, […] Continue reading

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Uniqueness for Change – Marilyn Ufrazio

My understanding from Blake’s critique is that every individual is born with two things: 1. innate abilities and 2. things that are learned throughout one’s life time. When it comes to art, however, it’s something one either knows how to do exceedingly well or is simply learned through experience. In The Lacoon, the quote “Israel […] Continue reading

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Unshackled Chains

“I will free from your oppression and will rescue you from your slavery in Egypt” Exodus 6:6 William Blake’s analogy relies on the biblical context that Israel was delivered to freedom from the oppressive enslaving grip of Egypt. The second half of the encryption in Blake’s “The Lagoon” compares then art being delivered from something […] Continue reading

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An Exodus from Reynolds

The phrase “Israel deliverd from Egypt is Art deliverd from Nature & Imitation” (352) is prefaced with the inscription “Spiritual War” (352). This preface, a preface of “Spiritual War,” seems to serve to remind the viewer that the very nature of art, to Blake, is spiritual and deeply religious, and the idea that art can […] Continue reading

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Innate Ability Vs. Frauds

Blake showed that he detests Reynolds view on art and believes that art is something that people are born with. If you are born without the talent then it is impossible to become better. Blake argues that other artists should break out of the confines of perfection. In Discourse III, Reynolds argues that younger painters […] Continue reading

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Resisting Conventional Ideals of Art

Based on Blake’s critique of Reynolds’ Works, it appears that Blake’s opinion towards art is that art is inherently in every one of us, and artistic genius cannot be learned. In his seething critique, Blake defends the notion that artists should not strive for conventional ideals of “perfection”, because to do so is to “undermine […] Continue reading

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Thinking Outside the Box (of Imitation and Nature)

One of the things I have loved the most about Blake in my first few days of encountering his work is the constant not only opportunity, but obligation he offers his readers for interpretation. Moreover, it is not enough for Blake to simply force you to consider and offer possible interpretations of his works; he […] Continue reading

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Deforming Great Art

The analogy “Israel deliverd from Egypt is Art deliverd from Nature & Imitation” is about slavery and deliverance in relation to art. Blake is saying that an artist who imitates other artists or nature is enslaved. I think this print is as much about the reception of art as its creation because Blake wants us […] Continue reading

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