Category Archives: Blake’s philosophy of art (9/4)

Blake’s Encryption

To understand Blakes message, “Israel delivered from Egypt is Art delivered from Nature & Imitation,” one must take into considerations Reynolds perspective on the matter. Reynolds believes that “a mere copier of nature can never produce anything great… instead of endeavoring to amuse mankind with the minute neatness of his imitations, he must endeavor to […] Continue reading

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The Poetical Understanding of a Nonsense Phrase

Art as shown from Blake is seen to be one of the most magnificent things as it can be created from a Void, to the point where the act of creating art itself is that akin to the Poetic Genius. There are infinite possibilities that can be created via the medium of art, and the […] Continue reading

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Simple and Simply unsimple

William Blake’s rather unlighted and scornful attitude towards Reynold’s definition of a poetic genius is simply simple yet unsimple. According to Blak being a poetic Genuis, are those who are enlighted by the sciences and art with a take of their inspired, and individual originality. In other words, it is not that of which Reynold […] Continue reading

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Life Imitates Life

In “The Discourses of Art,” Sir Joshua Reynold writes, “a mere copier of nature can never produce anything great,” also adding that “instead of endeavoring to amuse mankind with the minute neatness of his imitations, he must endeavor to improve by the grandeur of his ideas” (41-42). His take on art reflects his strong ideology […] Continue reading

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Imagination and Art: Is peace an inspiration or goal for Blake to obtain?

The image that is depicted for William Blake’s poem represents the central main figure as Jehovah and its two sons: Adam and Satan. Also, it’s accompanied by serpents that are crawling around the three figures. However, it’s very complex to comprehend and relate the image to Blake’s poem. As I was doing research for the […] Continue reading

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Poetic Genius: The Artistic Exodus

William Blake’s inscription in “The Laocoon” is used to differentiate his liberating definition of art from Sir Joshua Reynolds. The analogy is a biblical reference to when the Israelites escaped their servitude to the Egyptians. Blake uses this context to call attention to the artificiality of the Nature that Reynolds views as the principle that […] Continue reading

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The Necessity of God in Our Being

In the “Discourses on Art” by Sir Joshua Reynolds, he describes the process the Artist must experience to aspire the Ideal Beauty and its purpose. The Painter must examine the forms in nature continuously, until the artist has an idea of the central form. After comprehending the central form, the Painter must understand a variety […] Continue reading

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A-priori or A-posteriori Knowledge; Where Does Art Belong?

In Reynold’s “Discourse on Art” he reflects that “a mere copier of nature can never produce any thing great” and in addition to this, “instead of endeavouring to amuse mankind with the minute neatness of his imitations, he must endeavour to improve by the grandeur of his ideas” (41-42).  Whereas the notion of the graffiti […] Continue reading

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Truths and Ideals

In Sir Joshua Reynold’s analysis in his work “The Discourses of Art,” he proposes that “a mere copier of nature can never produce anything great,” implying that a true artistic genius must “[captivate] the imagination” through their own accord only (41-42). The graffiti inscribed on William Blake’s “The Lacoon” echoes his own stance on the […] Continue reading

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Art and Religion: Inspiration IS God

Christopher Ingle This piece is not easy to interpret. On one hand we have Blake who believes strongly in God, so much so that he believes that God is art, or at least that is how I interpreted it. Blake writes about his disdain of Reynold’s work. Reynold tells us that art is not based […] Continue reading

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