Category Archives: Cognitive Studies

Music, Langauge, and A Non-tradiational Collaboration

When I began the semester, I was interested in the way I saw music functioning in contemporary speculative fiction as a sort of language or communication tool that could transcend traditionally static boundaries, so I wanted to learn more about the re… Continue reading

Posted in Cognitive Studies, interdisciplinary, language, music, Music and the Mind, music cognition, neuroscience, Vanderbilt University | Comments Off on Music, Langauge, and A Non-tradiational Collaboration

Thoughts on Interdisciplinarity, Cognitive Science, and 19th-Century Aesthetics

Interdisciplinary is an at times seemingly vague buzzword invoked in academia. It is often used in general documents like Vanderbilt’s academic strategic plan. Recently, however, it has become a little less of an abstract concept for me. I have spent… Continue reading

Posted in 19th-century aesthetics, cognitive science, Cognitive Studies, Daniel Levin, disciplines, history of science, interdisciplinary, Levin Lab, perception, Vanderbilt University, visual perception, Visuality | Comments Off on Thoughts on Interdisciplinarity, Cognitive Science, and 19th-Century Aesthetics

Wound Up: Rape, Trauma, and Exploitation Tropes in “The Windup Girl”

Before I read Bacigalupi’s novel, my mental image of a “windup girl” evoked a creature like Olympia from E.T.A. Hoffman’s “Sandman”: delicate and hauntingly removed from the events of the world around her.  Bacigalupi’s Emiko, however, f… Continue reading

Posted in coercion, Cognitive Studies, consent, exploitation films, gender, Gender studies, I Spit on Your Grave, Madame Butterfly, Ms. 45, Orientalism, Paolo Bacigalupi, PTSD, rape, Science Fiction, The Windup Girl, trauma, violence | Comments Off on Wound Up: Rape, Trauma, and Exploitation Tropes in “The Windup Girl”

Objectivity and the Persona of the Artist

One of the recurrent images considered in Daston and Galison’s book Objectivity is that of the artist in contrast with the scientist. The most extensive discussion of this relation comes in chapter two, where generally in the eighteenth century, “t… Continue reading

Posted in artists, Cognitive Studies, Enlightenment, history of science, intuition, modernism, nineteenth century, objectivity, reason, Scientists, Selfhood, sensation, subjectivity, Visuality | Comments Off on Objectivity and the Persona of the Artist

The Story on Stories: Narrative in Generosity

Erin Pellarin examines the metafictional aspects of Richard Powers’s Generosity in her blog post, analyzing each major character in order to delve into the stories within the overarching narrative. Through a closer look at the individual characters’ stories, Pellarin brings up a question applicable to our daily lives: what responsibility and ability do we have […] Continue reading

Posted in Cognitive Studies, gene sequencing, genetic engineering, importance of stories, narrative, public sphere versus private, Science and humanities | Comments Off on The Story on Stories: Narrative in Generosity

The Place of the Humanities: Words and Silence in Super Sad True Love Story

  In the past three novels, I have been thinking a lot about the place of the humanities both now in our actual world and in the envisioned world of the books. In Generosity, the stereotypical science/humanities split is shown to be faulty, as either side of the coin is shown to be lacking. Rather, […] Continue reading

Posted in " communication, "Hamlet, Cognitive Studies, Course related, humanities, science, technology | Comments Off on The Place of the Humanities: Words and Silence in Super Sad True Love Story

A World of Saturdays: The Unities and Beyond

In the early 1580s, Sir Phillip Sidney wrote his now famous The Defense of Poesy. In it, besides arguing for poetry’s ability to instruct the mind to higher things, Sidney also argues for the classical unities. He claims that a piece of work should take place in one main setting, during one day, and with […] Continue reading

Posted in "Classical Unities, "Saturday, Cognitive Studies, Course related, Ian McEwan, Invasion of outside world, Terrorism and War | Comments Off on A World of Saturdays: The Unities and Beyond

The Story on Stories: Narrative in Generosity

While most basically Generosity is a novel about finding the “happiness gene,” in this case, in a singular, unique woman, the novel is also about the telling of stories and the creation of new ones, a fact most easily attested to by the central presence of Russell, a writer and one-time professor. As the novel […] Continue reading

Posted in Cognitive Studies, Course related, gene sequencing, genetic engineering, importance of stories, narrative, public sphere versus private | Comments Off on The Story on Stories: Narrative in Generosity