Category Archives: Cracking the code

Just how close are we to building an airplane?

Now that we have the entire human genome sequenced, were only a few short experiments away from curing genetic diseases like Cystic Fibrosis and Tay-Sachs … right? With all the hype surrounding the Human Genome Project and its completion at the turn of the century, we must not lose sight of what this incredible accomplishment […] Continue reading

Posted in CF, Cracking the code, Cystic Fibrosis, Genes, genetic engineering, Science and humanities, SNP | Comments Off on Just how close are we to building an airplane?

The Business of Competition

While Craig Venter could be considered a morally repugnant man for some of his actions (using his own DNA in Celera’s research into the human genome, using the government’s decoded DNA in his project, etc), I like to think that he was also a catalytic force in the areas of genetic research. He has a […] Continue reading

Posted in business, competition, Cracking the code, craig venter, genetics, human genome project, NOVA, Science and humanities | Comments Off on The Business of Competition

How much can we change? How much should we change?

In “Cracking the Code,” words such as instruction book, blueprint, and manual are used in order to describe a DNA molecule.  The program repeatedly states that the DNA can be “read,” as if it is some sort of book.  One bioethist, George Annas, refers to the DNA molecule as a future diary because the information […] Continue reading

Posted in bioethics, Cracking the code, Gattaca, genetic determinism, genetics, Science and humanities | Comments Off on How much can we change? How much should we change?