Category Archives: culture

Science Fiction: Disrupting the Art World?

Some previous posts on the blog have discussed how culture – art and fashion – are represented in science fiction. But is science fiction ever represented in art? I have two words for you: Meow Wolf. Meow Wolf is an immersive, interactive art experience based in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The inaugural exhibition, The House of […] Continue reading

Posted in anarchy, art, commerce, culture, Cyberpunk, Fantasy, Games, Multiverse, robots, Scientists, SF, speculative fiction, Time travel | Comments Off on Science Fiction: Disrupting the Art World?

Family Poems for Every Day of the Week

A bilingual celebration of family, Family Poems for Every Day of the Week (Poemas Familiaries para cada día de la semana) is a collection of poems that reflect the multicultural life experiences of many Latino children today. The poems were written by Francisco X. Alarcón and are based on his childhood experiences and his family. Maya […] Continue reading

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Last Stop on Market Street

I cannot say enough good things about Matt de la Peña and Christian Robinson’s 2015 Last Stop on Market Street. I stumbled upon it quite by accident, tugging on its bright orange spine in the hopes that the book would be less dusty and worn than the others I’d found in the library…and I was not […] Continue reading

Posted in 2015, beauty, Caldecott, children, christian robinson, colors, compassion, culture, cute, diversity, elementary school, family, Grades K-2, grateful, help, human, Humanity, kindness, last stop on market street, Marvelous Picture Books, matt de la peña, multicultural, nana, New Releases, newbery medal, perspective, picture book, poverty, soup kitchen | Comments Off on Last Stop on Market Street

Etiquette

“Your Majesty, have you had a chance to look through the etiquette handbook that the Kadarowo so kindly sent to us?” “Hmm..I may have flipped through a couple pages.” “Your Majesty! We are meeting with the Kadarowoan Prime… Continue reading

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On Physics Tests and Roses

I was miffed. “The names of the scientists are going to be on the test?” My honors physics teacher, who I regarded as a generally reasonable man, had lost touch with reality and was resorting to the lowest of low testing methods: rote memorization without purpose. Memorizing formulas was one thing–those were tools, mental shortcuts […] Continue reading

Posted in art, books, college, consciousness, culture, God, history, Paradox, Ray Bradbury, Sci-Fi, Science Fiction, Scientists, Time, Time travel | Comments Off on On Physics Tests and Roses

Is Station Eleven science fiction? Does it matter?

Last year, Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven was published, a novel which follows a small cast of interconnected figures through various spatial and temporal settings, most notably the upper Midwest approximately twenty years after a pandemic has wiped out the bulk of the world’s human population. Largely due to the incredible vividness of that future Mandel […] Continue reading

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The “Vanished Children”: Routinized War in Spin and Beyond

In “Air War Prophecy and Interwar Modernism,” Paul K. Saint-Amour posits a “routinization of emergency” and draws upon Lewis Mumford’s The Culture of Cities to describe a “collective psychosis” which was instigated by pre-war anxiety. Sai… Continue reading

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Nanotechnology and the NanoNarrative: Is Small the New Big?

Brooks Landon’s essay, “Less is More: Much Less is Much More: The Insistent Allure of Nanotechnology in Science Fiction” in the anthology, Nanoculture begins with a true statement of storytelling if I’ve ever heard one: “Size has … Continue reading

Posted in Brooks Landon, culture, history of science, homunculus, nanonarrative, nanotechnology, narrative, science, Science Fiction, Structure of Scientific Revolutions, technology, technoscience, Thomas Kuhn, Visuality | Comments Off on Nanotechnology and the NanoNarrative: Is Small the New Big?

What Does A Seth Rogan Film and Rick Ross Lyrics Have in Common?

This blog post comes in light of a quote recently stated by Rick Ross, as well as our discussions in class on media representations and how they shape our understandings of certain things. Rape can be very simply understood or … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Class Blog, culture, Gone with the Wind, Observe and Report, rape, Rick Ross, Seth Rogen, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Wedding Crashers | Comments Off on What Does A Seth Rogan Film and Rick Ross Lyrics Have in Common?

Minding Your Own Beeswax and the Middlemarch Twitterverse

“News is often dispersed as thoughtlessly and effectively as that pollen which the bees carry off (having no idea how powdery they are) when they are buzzing in search of their particular nectar.”  -George Eliot, Middlemarch, Book VI, Chap… Continue reading

Posted in " pollination, "social media, "victorian literature, 19th Century, bees, bioculture, biopolitics, culture, ecosystems, eliot, Eliot, George, Inception, Middlemarch, pollen, popular science, twitter | Comments Off on Minding Your Own Beeswax and the Middlemarch Twitterverse