Category Archives: DES

How Darwin’s Theory of Evolution Applies to Cryptography

Public key cryptography was invented by the academic researchers Diffie, Hellman, Merkle, Rivest, Shamir, and Adleman. They’re the ones who came up with the idea, and they’re the ones who created functions that could work with it. Here’s the issue: British GCHQ researchers Ellis, Cocks, and Williamson did all of those things too. The only […] Continue reading

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For The Greater Good

The National Security Agency has been criticized for decades due to the very nature of its purpose; no one likes the idea that someone can read their emails, listen to their phone calls, or act as an observant third-party on any private two-way communication. But, at the end of the day, so long as the […] Continue reading

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The NSA is okay … Technically.

The NSA seeks to act in its best interests. Therefore the release of the DES should come as no surprise to anyone. Though technically created by IBM, NSA was heavily involved in the creation process. At the center of the encryption are the substitution S-tables, the part where the NSA had the most involvement. Naturally […] Continue reading

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Justification

The National Security Agency has one main priority, the protection analysis of communications, both domestic and foreign , that pose a threat to the United states of America. The NSA would be unable to do their job if they weren’t able to … Continue reading Continue reading

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Safe Enough?

When Horst Feistel developed the Lucifer system for encrypting information on computers, it had an infinite number of keys that could be used to encipher so it would actually be beyond the code breaking abilities of the National Security Agency (NSA). … Continue reading Continue reading

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The Cost of Safety

Though almost every American instinctively cringes at the mention of government limiting freedoms and invading privacy, I believe that often this invasion of privacy is a necessary evil to ensure safety. By limiting the DES, or Data Encryption Standard, to 56 bits … Continue reading Continue reading

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The Invisible Hand of the NSA

In the 1970’s, Internet was still new technology and cryptography was not even considered a legitimate field of mathematics. Cryptography was considered a pen and paper tactic for wartime security and the general public was not equipped to apply any … Continue reading Continue reading

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Sufficiently Safe

Although it is fair to say that businesses were forced to rely on security that was less than optimal, the security they were using was more than sufficient. The Data Encryption Standard (DES) has a maximum amount of keys of … Continue reading Continue reading

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Limiting Lucipher

I believe that the NSA was justified in limiting the strength of the Data Encryption Standard (DES) so that they would be able to decipher any message that was sent using Lucipher. Lucipher was a complicated encryption system that relied … Continue reading Continue reading

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