Category Archives: Double Helix

The Tension of Time

  I wrote my last blog post on the structure of “Cloud Atlas”. The story jumps in time, setting, and cast of characters. The stories overlap and carry themes over a very long period of time. Since “Cloud Atlas”, we have read and discussed James Watson’s “The Double Helix”, Ian McEwan’s “Saturday”, and Margaret Atwood’s […] Continue reading

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The Genetic Plot

The first five sections of David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas showcase an eclectic formats. Readers are enveloped into a close first person journal, privy to letter correspondences and interview transcriptions, and pulled along in suspense-filled mysteries. Some formats allow more insight into a characters motives than others. Across the styles, characters are mercilessly driven to their […] Continue reading

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Genetics and Literature 2014-01-12 18:52:52

Introductions are my favorite thing to write. At the start of the intro, structure is less rigid. An author can do whatever it takes to get the readers hooked. Then suddenly, it’s the thesis, and the preview of everything I have to say. By this point, the reader is hooked and dragged into the slew […] Continue reading

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Are you genetically predisposed to be annoying?

Has there ever just been one person that can annoy you in three seconds flat?  Or perhaps you know someone who has the most explosive temper? In the past, people have always been thought to be responsible for themselves and their behavior, but as we learn more and more about our genes and their effects […] Continue reading

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Literature of Science, or Science of Literature?

As I reached the climax of Ian McEwan’s Saturday, I must admit that I was slightly put off by Baxter’s reaction to Daisy’s poem. Now, I get it: McEwan was saying that literature can be powerful enough to cause a mood swing, to change someone’s mind, and in this case, to overcome science, but as […] Continue reading

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