Category Archives: dystopia

Undertale – Player Agency in a Sci-Fi World

Whenever I’m reading a book that transports me to another world, or another version of reality, I always think about what I would do if I were in the main character’s shoes. That’s part of what it’s like to relate to a character – to experience their story alongside them, seeing how they act, and […] Continue reading

Posted in dystopia, Fahrenheit 451, Frankenstein, Interactive Media, Mary Shelley, Ray Bradbury, SF, Undertale, Video Games | Comments Off on Undertale – Player Agency in a Sci-Fi World

Confessions of a Librarian’s Daughter

I can’t stand when people watch a movie before they read the book. There. I said it. Even back in fourth grade when a film adaptation of Jeff Kinney’s renowned Diary of a Wimpy Kid hit theaters, I was appalled by my young cohort watching in awe from front row seats, so mindless of the […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Atwood, dystopia, Fiction, Films, hulu, Margaret Atwood, Science Fiction, SF, sf movies, The Handmaid's Tale | Comments Off on Confessions of a Librarian’s Daughter

Cloud Atlas: Everything Is Connected

Let’s be honest. Cloud Atlas — both Cloud Atlas the book and “Cloud Atlas” the movie — is dense. It’s complicated, and it’s almost dizzying in scope. I know of no other work of art that has covered as many facets of the human experience: life and death, love and greed. The book is a masterpiece, and yet author […] Continue reading

Posted in Cloning, Cloud Atlas, discrimination, dystopia, Films, genetic engineering, oppression, post-apocalypse, post-apocalyptic | Comments Off on Cloud Atlas: Everything Is Connected

Snowpiercer And The Rise Of Cli-Fi

Note: I know that not everyone has seen Snowpiercer, but if you do get some free time this weekend, catch it on Netflix because it’s a brilliant and intense film (a whole new spin on Netflix and ‘chill’)!   One of the reasons I&#… Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Baxter, Benford, cannibalism, Climate Change and Ecology, dystopia, Ecological disaster, Fiction, Films, Heinlein, human experience, ice age, SF, Snowpiercer, social commentary | Comments Off on Snowpiercer And The Rise Of Cli-Fi

Snowpiercer And The Rise Of Cli-Fi

Note: I know that not everyone has seen Snowpiercer, but if you do get some free time this weekend, catch it on Netflix because it’s a brilliant and intense film (a whole new spin on Netflix and ‘chill’)!   One of the reasons I&#… Continue reading

Posted in Authors, Baxter, Benford, cannibalism, Climate Change and Ecology, dystopia, Ecological disaster, Fiction, Films, Heinlein, human experience, ice age, SF, Snowpiercer, social commentary | Comments Off on Snowpiercer And The Rise Of Cli-Fi

Natural or Unnatural Selection?: Darwin and the evolutionary success of genetically engineered species in Bacigalupi’s Windup Girl

“Emiko doesn’t meet his gaze, looks out instead at the circling cats amongst the diners. ‘Generippers learned too much from cheshires” (114). `~ Paolo Bacigalupi, The Windup Girl I recently heard an undergraduate biomedical eng… Continue reading

Posted in biomedicine, Darwin, dystopia, evolution, Science Fiction | Comments Off on Natural or Unnatural Selection?: Darwin and the evolutionary success of genetically engineered species in Bacigalupi’s Windup Girl

On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

***This post contains spoilers!  If you are reading this, and you haven’t finished Oryx and Crake, step away from the computer and get back to it!*** I read Oryx and Crake primarily as a novel of trauma, extending past the genocidal crescendo of… Continue reading

Posted in Atwood, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, gender, meaning-making, narrative, narrative structure, Novelists, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, subjectivity | Comments Off on On Humanized Trauma in Oryx and Crake, or, “Why the Individual Narrative Is So Important”

De-Sensitizing the Operating Room: Normalizing the “Unnatural” in The Island of Dr. Moreau

I say I became habituated to the Beast People, that a thousand things that had seemed unnatural and repulsive speedily became natural and ordinary to me. (The Island of Dr. Moreau, End of Chapter 15) I used to consider myself a very squeamish person. T… Continue reading

Posted in "victorian literature, 19th Century, 20th Century, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, Ethics of science, H.G. Wells, history of science, role of scientists, Science Fiction, technology, The Island of Dr. Moreau, Visuality | Comments Off on De-Sensitizing the Operating Room: Normalizing the “Unnatural” in The Island of Dr. Moreau

Text Adventure Game: The Complex

A quick link to the text adventure game we built for this class can be found here. It’s inspired by many of the dystopian themes that appear throughout the books we’ve read and even features a few cameos from classmates and famous scientists.   – ZachFiled under: Science and humanities Tagged: adventure, complex, dystopia, text Continue reading

Posted in adventure, complex, dystopia, Science and humanities, text | Comments Off on Text Adventure Game: The Complex

Dystopian Fictions As a Function of Their Times

Ever since dystopian and post-apocalyptic fiction became genres, both readers and critics alike have debated the predictive qualities of such texts. In hindsight, they sometimes seem to prophesy the future with eerie accuracy, like the “parlor walls” from Fahrenheit 451, which are oddly similar to today’s ever-present televisions. However, while it’s certainly tempting to draw […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, dystopia, Future, Oryx and Crake, Posthuman, predict, Science Fiction, Super Sad True Love Story | Comments Off on Dystopian Fictions As a Function of Their Times