Category Archives: Ethics of science

De-Sensitizing the Operating Room: Normalizing the “Unnatural” in The Island of Dr. Moreau

I say I became habituated to the Beast People, that a thousand things that had seemed unnatural and repulsive speedily became natural and ordinary to me. (The Island of Dr. Moreau, End of Chapter 15) I used to consider myself a very squeamish person. T… Continue reading

Posted in "victorian literature, 19th Century, 20th Century, biomedicine, biopolitics, disillusion, dystopia, ethics, Ethics of science, H.G. Wells, history of science, role of scientists, Science Fiction, technology, The Island of Dr. Moreau, Visuality | Comments Off on De-Sensitizing the Operating Room: Normalizing the “Unnatural” in The Island of Dr. Moreau

Genetics and Environment: Final Project

The global population is expected to increase by almost 3 billion people by the year 2100. Genetic adaptations and manipulations will result in better nutrition, superior health, and longevity for these generations of humans. Despite the many positive outcomes positive eugenics can have for the individual, an increased population may have devastating affects on consumption, […] Continue reading

Posted in Class Projects, Cloning, Ethics of science, Eugenics, Gattaca, genetic determinism, genetic engineering, Posthuman, Science and humanities | Comments Off on Genetics and Environment: Final Project

Genetic Modification in Science Fiction

Well, the title may be a bit misleading. I’d like to focus on two novels in particular: one, we are reading in this class (Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood) and the other in my Medicine and Literature class (Dawn by Octavia Butler). What’s interesting to me is that both of my classes have converged on […] Continue reading

Posted in Aliens, Collaboration in Humanities, Dawn, ethics, Ethics of science, genetic engineering, genetic modification, Octavia Butler, Oryx and Crake, post-apocalyptic world, science, Science Fiction | Comments Off on Genetic Modification in Science Fiction

What is the Meaning of Life ¿

Until the prophesies of “X-men” come to fruition and humanity undergoes an official onset evolution, the meaning of life is very simple. How different are we from the characters in Never Let Me Go?  As far as production and purpose are concerned, the average person’s impact upon the world, whether it be their destruction of the […] Continue reading

Posted in Ethics of science, Humanity, Meaning of Life, Never Let Me Go, philosophy, Posthuman, Religion and genetics, Science and humanities | Comments Off on What is the Meaning of Life ¿

The Wisdom of Ignorance

Human cloning is undoubtedly a topic that gets strong opinions circulating. While I don’t think I can personally get behind it, The Wisdom of Repugnance seemed to be against it for the wrong reasons. Kass undoubtedly meant to be inflammatory, but in the process he dehumanized and devalued several minorities. He also perpetuated several outdated […] Continue reading

Posted in Cloning, Ethics of science, human cloning, leon kass, the wisdom of repugnance | Comments Off on The Wisdom of Ignorance

You Have to Consider the Idea that God does not Like You!

Writing this blog post is my pain; this is my burning hand, as is reading and grading it your pain. Even though Brad Pitt can make anything interesting, this scene from “Fight Club” encapsulates an angle not yet considered, and in all probability will not be, except for this blog post, that we do not […] Continue reading

Posted in Adam and Eve, Brad Pitt, Ethics of science, evolution, Films, Posthuman, Religion and genetics, Science and humanities, Science Fiction | Comments Off on You Have to Consider the Idea that God does not Like You!

A World Without Einstein

In the 1997 film, Gattaca, the directors are trying to communicate the dangers of genetic engineering and human-influenced evolution. And while the film is not subtle with its reproach of the implied eugenics movement that is inherent in genetic screening, it really hits its point home with its deleted pre-credits scene. At 8:52 of the […] Continue reading

Posted in art versus science, deleted scenes, Einstein, Ethics of science, Eugenics, evolution, Future, Gattaca, Genetic discrimination, genetic engineering, genetics, human genome project | Comments Off on A World Without Einstein

Patenting of DNA Code…

I was very interested in the NOVA documentary section on the patenting of sections of DNA code.  As a big music person, I’ve always been interested in discussions of copy-writing of  creative works.  It seems valid to me that people should want to copy-write their creations and receive due credit and compensation, and I think […] Continue reading

Posted in Ethics of science, Gene patenting, genetic engineering, Science and humanities | Comments Off on Patenting of DNA Code…

Genetics and Literature 2014-01-12 18:52:52

Introductions are my favorite thing to write. At the start of the intro, structure is less rigid. An author can do whatever it takes to get the readers hooked. Then suddenly, it’s the thesis, and the preview of everything I have to say. By this point, the reader is hooked and dragged into the slew […] Continue reading

Posted in Double Helix, Ethics of science, genetic determinism, Science and humanities | Comments Off on Genetics and Literature 2014-01-12 18:52:52

Incorrectly Cracking the Code of Life

After watching NOVA’s 2001 special, “Cracking the Code of Life”, which not only explores the superficial characteristics of DNA but also depicts various bioethical issues, I can’t help but be frustrated with the documentary’s depiction of the Lord family. Each of the twin Lord brothers had a son with Tay Sachs, an awful diagnosis for […] Continue reading

Posted in Autism, bioethics, DNA, down's syndrome, Ethics of science, evolution, family, genetic determinism, Genetic discrimination, genetic disorder, genetics, learning disability, missed milestones, NOVA, Science and humanities, Tay Sachs, twins, work force | Comments Off on Incorrectly Cracking the Code of Life