Category Archives: Experience, Earth, and Adulthood (9/18)

Contrary: Lack Thereof

The lack of the contrary between “The Chimney-Sweeper” and “The Little Black Boy” stresses Blakes questions on how we know that God exists and whether a  “good” God who allows children of poorer circumstances to suffer is truly “good”. These non-contrarian poems assist in relaying the innocent perspective and tone of children for the circumstances […] Continue reading

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To Allow One’s Sleep, Is to Allow One’s Dream

When reading “Little Girl Lost,” by William Blake, the first immediate difference that I noticed was the difference in detail, length of the poem, and specificity of imagery. “The Little Girl Lost” begins with two stanzas that appear to be describing a vision- a moment of clarity where one is able to reflect and shift […] Continue reading

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A Transition Between Innocence & Experience

In William Blake’s The Songs of Experience, the shift of tone and expression changed drastically from Blake’s The Songs of Innocence. The series of poems/songs in The Songs of Experience are less angelic and more religious. Perhaps, the contrast among innocence and experience explains the black and white dynamic that creates serious, creepy, sad, or […] Continue reading

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The Impoverished Flowers of London

  In The Songs of Innocence and of Experience by William Blake, the poem “Holy Thursday” is in both collections, presenting a stark contrast that informs the conditions of impoverish children in London. “Holy Thursday” from The Songs of Innocence illustrates the external perspective of these children of poverty. The poem introduces the children as “innocent […] Continue reading

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How We Cherish Suffering

William Blake’s, The Divine Image gives personification to Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love. Inscribing the terms a correlation to one another amongst God and man, it provides a distinctive meaning of why God is powerful for the human mind to comprehend. With the suffering, man is thankful for such a sensation to God because they […] Continue reading

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The Mind is a Powerful Place

 In The Divine Image from The Songs of Innocence, Blake is addressing Mercy, Pity, Peace and Love. This poem takes all four aspects and individually connects them to the aspects of humanity; where “Mercy has a human heart” which is personifying an emotion (l. 9). To “Pity, a human face / And Love, the human form […] Continue reading

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Cloak Innocence Must Fade

The poems, “The Laughing Song,” in Song of Innocence and, “The Voice of the Ancient Bard,” from Songs of Experience by William Blake, are immensely contrasted within the content. For example, the poem, “The Laughing Song,” appears to be a non-sensical yet joyful poem about a happy laughing world. In a world, where the “voice […] Continue reading

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To Sulk Upon My Joyful Mother’s Breast

In William Blake’s “Infant Joy” within his compilation of Songs of Innocence, the jubilant speaker sings of joy in hopes that a newborn infant will find it in life, yet it is not made clear if the speaker is the mother or the baby themselves. In his companion piece “Infant Sorrow” found within his Songs […] Continue reading

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The Contrary States: Shifting Perspectives

For next Wednesday (9/18), students will analyze a poem from The Songs of Experience that has a “contrary” or negative twin poem in The Songs of Innocence.  How do these contrary poems/designs mutually inform, interrupt, or revise each other in a manner that is not apparent when these poems are read in isolation? Alternatively, students […] Continue reading

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