Category Archives: Gaze

War paint or whore paint? Or just paint?

I decided to wear my favorite lipstick today.  It’s red-orange and works surprisingly well with my purple/magenta/pink hair.  Tonight I was hanging out with some friends, and one of them, a guy, complimented my lipstick and joked around about who … Continue reading Continue reading

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Gaze in “Blink”

The Dr. Who episode “Blink” suffers from a number of problems in its portrayal of gaze and gender.  The whole episode focuses on gaze and watching people, especially those who are unaware that they are being watched.  From the beginning, … Continue reading Continue reading

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Final Project: Women Who Look in Hitchcock’s Films

For my final project, I plan to examine the female gaze/women who look within the work of Alfred Hitchcock.  I will look at Rear Window (1954), Suspicion (1941), and either Vertigo (1958) or Shadow or a Doubt (1943), but possibly both. … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Class Blog, Female Spectator, Gaze, hitchcock, Hooks, Modelski, mulvey, rear window, Shadow of a Doubt, Suspicion, Vertigo | Comments Off on Final Project: Women Who Look in Hitchcock’s Films

Why We Love Lisbeth

When we went around the room this week naming our favorite character from “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest,” Lisbeth definitely won the popularity vote. This got me thinking, what is it about her that makes us support her … Continue reading Continue reading

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Hypocrisy and Gaze in “Election”

The scene in which Mr. McAllister discusses his blossoming “friendship” with Linda highlights his hypocrisy, which is displayed throughout the film.  While in his voiceover Mr. McAllister attempts to present his actions in a positive light, clearly his behaviors are … Continue reading Continue reading

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Multiple Perspectives in Election: Tammy and the Gaze

Though Jim McAlister is arguably the protagonist of Alexander Payne’s Election (1999), the film offers a unique omniscient narration that allows three other characters—Tracy Flick, and Paul and Tammy Metzler—to occasionally hijack the narrative and narration for themselves. Significantly, the … Continue reading Continue reading

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How to Approach the Character of Megan

The way we are supposed to relate to the protagonist, Megan, in But I’m a Cheerleader is difficult to figure out. Are we meant to identify with her, or pity her as a victim? Should we believe that she truly … Continue reading Continue reading

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Bound and the Heterosexual Female Viewer

It has classically been said that as the heterosexual male gaze dominates cinema. Not only are most protagonists created specifically so that the heterosexual male spectator may identify with them, but the purpose of women in film is often to … Continue reading Continue reading

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Rear Window and Reflexivity

I liked when we talked in class about Rear Window being reflexive.  How the film is about film itself.  How Jeff is ignoring Lisa until she enters the screen. I liked that idea and it in fact never crossed my … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Alfred Hitchcock, Blog Post, Class Blog, Clifford Manlove, Gaze, hitchcock, John Fawell, rear window, Reflexivity, reversed gaze | Comments Off on Rear Window and Reflexivity

Rear Window Analysis

Bidisha in The Guardian suggests that Hitchcock’s movie “Rear Window” as well as many others suggest a negative attitude towards the women his films and the ways in which he wants them to be seen. Hitchcock has the ability to control … Continue reading Continue reading

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