Category Archives: Gender studies

When You Stare Into the Uncanny Valley, the Uncanny Valley Also Stares Into You: Posthuman Narratives in The Windup Girl

Like my dear colleague A.M. Lehr below, I also couldn’t help but make the comparison between Paolo Bacigaluipi’s The Windup Girl and E.T.A. Hoffman’s The Sandman… Possibly because of the “uncanny” resemblance in the … Continue reading

Posted in biopolitics, eta hoffman, Gender studies, jacques offenbach, narrative, Novelists, Paolo Bacigalupi, post-human, Science Fiction, technoscience, the sandman, The Windup Girl, uncanny, uncanny valley | Comments Off on When You Stare Into the Uncanny Valley, the Uncanny Valley Also Stares Into You: Posthuman Narratives in The Windup Girl

Wound Up: Rape, Trauma, and Exploitation Tropes in “The Windup Girl”

Before I read Bacigalupi’s novel, my mental image of a “windup girl” evoked a creature like Olympia from E.T.A. Hoffman’s “Sandman”: delicate and hauntingly removed from the events of the world around her.  Bacigalupi’s Emiko, however, f… Continue reading

Posted in coercion, Cognitive Studies, consent, exploitation films, gender, Gender studies, I Spit on Your Grave, Madame Butterfly, Ms. 45, Orientalism, Paolo Bacigalupi, PTSD, rape, Science Fiction, The Windup Girl, trauma, violence | Comments Off on Wound Up: Rape, Trauma, and Exploitation Tropes in “The Windup Girl”

Searching for MaddEve: Bare Life, Homo Sacer, and the Problem of Atwood’s Oryx

The labs and factory farms of Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake present us with a vertible zoo of zoē ─ a menagerie of bioforms that embody Giorgio Agamben’s concept of “bare life.” During his tour of Watson-Crick’s NeoAgriculturals wing, Continue reading

Posted in Agamben, Atwood, Margaret, bare life, biopolitics, Bride of Frankenstein, ChickieNobs, Gender studies, Homo Sacer, Jimmy, MaddAdam, MaddEve, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, Sex trafficking, Snowman, subjectivity | Comments Off on Searching for MaddEve: Bare Life, Homo Sacer, and the Problem of Atwood’s Oryx

WPATH & The Fantasy of a Transgender “Type”

“As an international interdisciplinary, professional organization, the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) will work to further the understanding and treatment of gender identity disorders by professionals in medicine, psych… Continue reading

Posted in biopolitics, Foucault, Galton, gender, Gender studies, History of Sexuality, transgender, WPATH | Comments Off on WPATH & The Fantasy of a Transgender “Type”

Recuperating Darwin: Is there anything left to offer?

Put frankly, I am perhaps a poor candidate to write a blog post addressing Darwin. Upon reading On the Origin of Species, I felt just as unwilling to recuperate and entertain Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution as I thought I would. … Continue reading

Posted in 19th Century, critique, Darwin, disability, evolution, Gender studies, transgender | Comments Off on Recuperating Darwin: Is there anything left to offer?

Caged in Desire, or How to Read an Unreliable Narrator: Anxiety, Projection, and Crushes in Henry James’s In the Cage

I’d like to open this post with some mood music: There we go.  That sets the stage nicely. In other words, In the Cage is a stomach-turning read for any fantasy-prone person (re: most of us) who has ever had an unrequited crush.  Let’s th… Continue reading

Posted in "victorian literature, 19th Century, disillusion, Freud, Gender studies, Henry James, humanities, In the Cage, mechanical servant, narrative, narrative structure, Novelists, subjectivity | Comments Off on Caged in Desire, or How to Read an Unreliable Narrator: Anxiety, Projection, and Crushes in Henry James’s In the Cage

Mounds of Venus, or What a Pile of Goddess Guts Can Teach Us About Objectivity

In their history of science tome, Objectivity (2010), Daston and Galison examine how the modern concept of objectivity emerged from the mid-nineteenth-century sciences. They argue that this ideal of objectivity requires “the suppression of some aspec… Continue reading

Posted in 19th Century, anatomical venus, erotic science, exquisite corpse, Gender studies, history of science, lady parts, Lorraine Daston, medical ethics, Peter Galison, torso explosion, Visuality | Comments Off on Mounds of Venus, or What a Pile of Goddess Guts Can Teach Us About Objectivity