Category Archives: genetic determinism

Genetics and Environment: Final Project

The global population is expected to increase by almost 3 billion people by the year 2100. Genetic adaptations and manipulations will result in better nutrition, superior health, and longevity for these generations of humans. Despite the many positive outcomes positive eugenics can have for the individual, an increased population may have devastating affects on consumption, […] Continue reading

Posted in Class Projects, Cloning, Ethics of science, Eugenics, Gattaca, genetic determinism, genetic engineering, Posthuman, Science and humanities | Comments Off on Genetics and Environment: Final Project

It was Very Good

“Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited to all we now know and understand, while imagination embraces the entire world, and all there ever will be to know and understand.” ― Albert Einstein Is she spinning clockwise or anti-clockwise? THE Right Brain vs Left Brain test … do you see the dancer […] Continue reading

Posted in "Saturday, Brain, clo souls, creativity, DNA, genetic determinism, Imagination | Comments Off on It was Very Good

The Genetic Plot

The first five sections of David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas showcase an eclectic formats. Readers are enveloped into a close first person journal, privy to letter correspondences and interview transcriptions, and pulled along in suspense-filled mysteries. Some formats allow more insight into a characters motives than others. Across the styles, characters are mercilessly driven to their […] Continue reading

Posted in Cloud Atlas, Double Helix, free will, genetic determinism, genetic engineering, Science and humanities, Science Fiction | Comments Off on The Genetic Plot

Genetics and Literature 2014-01-12 18:52:52

Introductions are my favorite thing to write. At the start of the intro, structure is less rigid. An author can do whatever it takes to get the readers hooked. Then suddenly, it’s the thesis, and the preview of everything I have to say. By this point, the reader is hooked and dragged into the slew […] Continue reading

Posted in Double Helix, Ethics of science, genetic determinism, Science and humanities | Comments Off on Genetics and Literature 2014-01-12 18:52:52

Incorrectly Cracking the Code of Life

After watching NOVA’s 2001 special, “Cracking the Code of Life”, which not only explores the superficial characteristics of DNA but also depicts various bioethical issues, I can’t help but be frustrated with the documentary’s depiction of the Lord family. Each of the twin Lord brothers had a son with Tay Sachs, an awful diagnosis for […] Continue reading

Posted in Autism, bioethics, DNA, down's syndrome, Ethics of science, evolution, family, genetic determinism, Genetic discrimination, genetic disorder, genetics, learning disability, missed milestones, NOVA, Science and humanities, Tay Sachs, twins, work force | Comments Off on Incorrectly Cracking the Code of Life

How much can we change? How much should we change?

In “Cracking the Code,” words such as instruction book, blueprint, and manual are used in order to describe a DNA molecule.  The program repeatedly states that the DNA can be “read,” as if it is some sort of book.  One bioethist, George Annas, refers to the DNA molecule as a future diary because the information […] Continue reading

Posted in bioethics, Cracking the code, Gattaca, genetic determinism, genetics, Science and humanities | Comments Off on How much can we change? How much should we change?

Genetic Mapping – Do You Want to Know?

The PBS Nova special “Cracking the Code” brought up a number of interesting possibilities about the future of DNA research. Most interesting to me was the special’s take on testing for specific genetic diseases and predispositions. “Sometimes, there may be a test, but it might take twenty years, or fifty years. Fifty years to find […] Continue reading

Posted in breast cancer gene, ethics, Ethics of science, genetic determinism, Genetic discrimination, Genetic testing, human genome project | Comments Off on Genetic Mapping – Do You Want to Know?

Powers, Pater, Penman: Generosity and Mindfulness

Richard Powers’s book Generosity, An Enhancement might center its narrative around the seemingly unflappable, amicable Thassa Amzwar, but is the book actually ABOUT her? Killian C. Quigley doesn’t seem to think so; using quotes from Walter Pater’s Studies in the History of the Renaissance and Danny Penman, he argues that the fascination with Thassa is […] Continue reading

Posted in 19th Century, 21st century, brain plasticity, cognitive science, Danny Penman, emotional health, Ethics of science, generosity, genetic determinism, happiness, Mark Williams, mental health, mindfulness, pathologization, psychology, richard powers, Science and humanities, Studies in the History of the Renaissance, Walter Pater | Comments Off on Powers, Pater, Penman: Generosity and Mindfulness

Wild Bioassumptions?

In the following article, Killian C Quigley considers the power, potential, and responsibilities that come with the increase of bioscience knowledge. By comparing Huxley’s Brave New World to Nikolas Rose’s The Politics of Life Itself: Biomedicine, Power, and Subjectivity in the Twenty-First Century to Frank Bruni’s Genetic or Not, Gay Won’t Go Away, Quigley offers […] Continue reading

Posted in bioethics, biological determinism, biomedicine, bioscience, Brave New World, Cynthia Nixon, difference, discrimination, Ethics of science, Frank Bruni, gay rights, genetic determinism, genetics, Huxley, laboratory, New York Times, Nikolas Rose, technology | Comments Off on Wild Bioassumptions?

Wild Bioassumptions?

In the following article, Killian C Quigley considers the power, potential, and responsibilities that come with the increase of bioscience knowledge. By comparing Huxley’s Brave New World to Nikolas Rose’s The Politics of Life Itself: Biomedicine, Power, and Subjectivity in the Twenty-First Century to Frank Bruni’s Genetic or Not, Gay Won’t Go Away, Quigley offers […] Continue reading

Posted in bioethics, biological determinism, biomedicine, bioscience, Brave New World, Cynthia Nixon, difference, discrimination, Ethics of science, Frank Bruni, gay rights, genetic determinism, genetics, Huxley, laboratory, New York Times, Nikolas Rose, technology | Comments Off on Wild Bioassumptions?