Category Archives: genetic ethics

CRISPR, Cloning, and Self Preservation: How SF Handles Morale

Cloning is my favorite thing ever. Okay, let me rephrase. Studying the sociological and scientific impacts of cloning is one of my favorite intellectual ventures (second only to my recent research on the Oxford comma). In high school, I even had the opportunity three times to hear renowned Harvard-alum Sam Rhine lecture at his annual […] Continue reading

Posted in clone, Cloning, CRISPR, Frankenstein, genetic ethics, genetic modification, genetics, Mary Shelley, organ donation, Science Fiction, SF | Comments Off on CRISPR, Cloning, and Self Preservation: How SF Handles Morale

A New Age of Eugenics?

Within the genre of science fiction, the issue of eugenics and the evolution of mankind through selective reproduction and genetic manipulation has played a prominent role works such as Frank Herbert’s Dune, Robert Heinlein’s Methuselah’s Children, and Octavia E. Butler’s Lilith’s Brood trilogy to name only a few. While commonly dismissed in the present-day as […] Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Butler, Octavia, CRISPR, Eugenics, evolution, Fiction, genetic engineering, genetic ethics, genetic manipulation, genetics, Heinlein, humanities, medical ethics | Comments Off on A New Age of Eugenics?

To alter, or not to alter, that is the question

Through advancements in modern science, the possibility of ‘designer babies’ who have had their genetic makeup artificially selected to ensure certain characteristics or genes is becoming more realistic. Specifically, genetic modification could affect a child’s susceptibility to disease, allow parents to choose a specific gender, determine personality traits, or even establish appearance and IQ. But […] Continue reading

Posted in altruism, Biology, Designer babies, discrimination, Gattaca, gene alteration, genetic ethics, genetic modification | Comments Off on To alter, or not to alter, that is the question