Category Archives: Genius

William Blake and An Alternative Genius

William Blake’s A Memorable Fancy has elements that speak to Moravian themes and ideas. Blake writes about a “Genius” that doesn’t necessarily align with the intellectual, academic, or conventional genius that’s taught at big universities. Blake’s is a different kind of genius, one Marsha Keith Schuchard writes about in her article titled “Young William Blake […] Continue reading

Posted in Christ and the Body (9/25), Emblematics, Genius, Moravian, Mother, William Blake | Comments Off on William Blake and An Alternative Genius

Natural Genius

Blake creates the idea that experience is not something anybody can gain with just age, that someone who is younger not just in life, but skill could outdo an older, more “experienced” person’s Genius. Blake mentions “The hours of folly are measured by the clock, but of wisdom; no clock can measure.” Folly is foolishness; […] Continue reading

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Set Your Imagination Free!

For the post next Wednesday (1/31), students will choose 3-4 plate designs from The Songs of Innocence (from any of the editions accessible in the Blake Archive, listed under “Friends & Links” below) to create your own story about this compilation of “songs.”  You will arrange these plates in any order that helps illustrate your […] Continue reading

Posted in Creation, Genius, Imagination, Innocence, Eden, and Childhood (1/27), Songs of Innocence | Comments Off on Set Your Imagination Free!

There are no rules to the genius

Sir Joshua Reynolds argues in Discourse III, “could we teach taste or genius by rules, they would be no longer taste and genius” (44). Which is to say that there is an unnatural, innate power of “taste” and “genius” that cannot be taught–or shouldn’t. That seems to debunk the whole idea of mentor and mentee relationships, […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Blake's philosophy of art (8/28), Genius, Imitation, nature, perception, Sir Joshua Reynolds, teaching, William Blake | Comments Off on There are no rules to the genius

Crooked Paths; or, the Longest Way Round Being the Shortest Home

The aphorisms of “Proverbs of Hell” operate on an antimonian rhetoric—indeed, their ideas often diametrical oppose to traditional conception. Such is there purpose: they are defibrillators for the soul, some shock, to stab into the stubborn, sluggish self and usurp pat formulations. Their infernal wisdom is one couched in dialectics. The proverb: “Improvement makes strait […] Continue reading

Posted in aphorism, Genius, Marriage of Heaven and Hell, Proverbs of Hell, Proverbs of Hell (9/18) | Comments Off on Crooked Paths; or, the Longest Way Round Being the Shortest Home

Thinking Outside the Box (of Imitation and Nature)

One of the things I have loved the most about Blake in my first few days of encountering his work is the constant not only opportunity, but obligation he offers his readers for interpretation. Moreover, it is not enough for Blake to simply force you to consider and offer possible interpretations of his works; he […] Continue reading

Posted in Blake, Blake's philosophy of art (8/28), Echo, Egypt, Genius, Immitation, Innovation, Israel, nature, Outside the Box, Ovid, Sophocles, Virgil | Comments Off on Thinking Outside the Box (of Imitation and Nature)