Category Archives: hubble

A Life in Orbit

Existing near the vacuum of space poses unique instrumentation and life cycle challenges for the Hubble telescope. The sun’s radiation has the potential to corrupt electronic signals or damage components, so many parts must be shielded and redundant systems are required. Without atmospheric regulation, the temperature of an object in orbit such as the HST … Continue reading A Life in Orbit Continue reading Continue reading

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Telescopes and Space

I don’t know about you, but without my glasses, I literally cannot see anything, even if it’s right in front me. Whether I’m sitting in the classroom trying to take notes from the professor’s lecture or trying to watch my favorite Netflix show, my ability to actually see anything with my naked eye is severely … Continue reading Telescopes and Space Continue reading Continue reading

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2200 Nanometers

About 1/50th a hair’s width. That’s the size of the error which seriously set back the Hubble telescope. Perkin-Elmer diagnostics was tasked with grinding down the primary mirror, a 7.8 foot wide *almost* flat surface. The mirror’s curvature was determined by a reflective mirror array which bends a laser to precisely trace the surface’s desired … Continue reading 2200 Nanometers Continue reading Continue reading

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The Space I Take Up: How Much of it Will I Get to Know?

Space. There is quite a bit of it. In the room I live in, there is 264 sq ft of it. On Earth, there is 196.9 million sq miles of it. But in space, it is seemingly infinite, or at least so it seems. With the Hubble constant still undetermined, and the shape of the… Continue Reading → Continue reading Continue reading

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Hubble Space Telescope Images the Most Distant Star Ever Observed

Last week, a group of astronomers announced in Nature Astronomy that they had discovered the furthest star ever seen: a blue supergiant named Icarus that shone nearly 10 billion years ago, and located more than halfway across the universe. The astronomers were able to do this with the Hubble, and gravitational lensing. Per the lead author of … Continue reading Hubble Space Telescope Images the Most Distant Star Ever Observed Continue reading Continue reading

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Hubble

The Hubble telescope, which has been orbiting Earth for over 25 years, views the universe with a completely different perspective than what we can see on Earth. While the telescope is not necessarily responsible for amazing images like this one, it can be given credit for other just as powerful views of the universe. Its… Continue reading Continue reading

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The Hubble Space Telescope

Until this past September when LIGO heard gravitational waves, our knowledge of the universe has come from visual observations. When Galileo began using his telescope in the early 1600s, our notion of the natural world completely evolved. Today, we have telescopes whose … Continue reading Continue reading Continue reading

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Observing Invisible Light

The invention of the telescope revolutionized the way astronomers observe the universe. They’ve enabled us to view light from around the galaxies that is not visible to the naked eye. These other forms of light can teach us things that visible light cannot – if we can find a way to visualize them. Astronomers today […] Continue reading Continue reading

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Hubble Telescope’s 25th Birthday

On April 24th, 2015, Hubble celebrated its 25th anniversary. It celebrated its birthday by taking some amazing images of some giant star clusters. The image above is one of Westerlund 2 which is a giant cluster of stars and dust – a breeding area for new stars. The dust pillars are the main areas where […] Continue reading Continue reading

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The James Webb Space Telescope

The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST or Webb) is set to be the official successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, due to launch is 2018. In order to understand how the JWST will be improving on the Hubble, I think it is first important to understand some of the light aspects of space observation. Model […] Continue reading Continue reading

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