Category Archives: Huxley

“Oh brave new world that has such people in it!”

It would take quite a long time for me to simply list every reference to Shakespeare in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, let alone analyze the significance of them. Honestly I don’t think I would even be able to find all of them, even with a re-reading of the book. Over the course of the […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, Fiction, gender, Huxley, Othello, SF, Shakespeare, The Tempest, VUTheatre | Comments Off on “Oh brave new world that has such people in it!”

Indifferent New Technology, Same Old World

Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is, according to Wikipedia, a novel that “anticipates developments in reproductive technology, sleep-learning, psychological manipulation, and classical conditioning that combine profoundly to change society.” The book is often interpreted as a cautionary tale, decrying the dangers of unfettered embrace of new technologies. Though the technologies in the novel are used to maintain a shockingly stratified […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, Fiction, Huxley, SF, soceity, technology, Vanderbilt | Comments Off on Indifferent New Technology, Same Old World

The Hollowness of Happiness

What if there were a machine that could give you any experience in the world, and that could continue to supply you with these self-actualizing experiences for your entire life? You could become a great novelist, have a whirl-wind romance, climb Mount Everest, achieve anything and everything you’ve ever dreamed of. All you have to […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, Experience Machine, happiness, Human Spirit, Huxley, Meaning of Life, Nozick, Science and humanities | Comments Off on The Hollowness of Happiness

Wild Bioassumptions?

In the following article, Killian C Quigley considers the power, potential, and responsibilities that come with the increase of bioscience knowledge. By comparing Huxley’s Brave New World to Nikolas Rose’s The Politics of Life Itself: Biomedicine, Power, and Subjectivity in the Twenty-First Century to Frank Bruni’s Genetic or Not, Gay Won’t Go Away, Quigley offers […] Continue reading

Posted in bioethics, biological determinism, biomedicine, bioscience, Brave New World, Cynthia Nixon, difference, discrimination, Ethics of science, Frank Bruni, gay rights, genetic determinism, genetics, Huxley, laboratory, New York Times, Nikolas Rose, technology | Comments Off on Wild Bioassumptions?

Wild Bioassumptions?

In the following article, Killian C Quigley considers the power, potential, and responsibilities that come with the increase of bioscience knowledge. By comparing Huxley’s Brave New World to Nikolas Rose’s The Politics of Life Itself: Biomedicine, Power, and Subjectivity in the Twenty-First Century to Frank Bruni’s Genetic or Not, Gay Won’t Go Away, Quigley offers […] Continue reading

Posted in bioethics, biological determinism, biomedicine, bioscience, Brave New World, Cynthia Nixon, difference, discrimination, Ethics of science, Frank Bruni, gay rights, genetic determinism, genetics, Huxley, laboratory, New York Times, Nikolas Rose, technology | Comments Off on Wild Bioassumptions?

Decanted Babies, Racialized Roses: Thingness in Brave New World

The question of humanity in the face of industrialization is a well-known theme in Brave New World, often times wondering whether humanity can even exist in the heavy atmosphere of “Fordism” and assembly-line machines. “Is Brave New Worlds society destroying the human aspect of its people?” is the question most people ask. But Dan Fang […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, decanting, Humanity, Huxley, machines, Racialized roses, thing | Comments Off on Decanted Babies, Racialized Roses: Thingness in Brave New World

The Meaning of Words: Dystopias, Utopias and the Lingusitic

As lovers of literature, we are no strangers to the world of language and expression. But what happens when a society is built upon the tenant that the words not only don’t exist, but carry no meaning? Erin Pellarin explores the meanings words can have on society and personal feeling, comparing John’s repertoire of Shakespearean […] Continue reading

Posted in Brave New World, culture, dystopia, Huxley, linguistics, meaning-making, Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, Science and humanities, Shakespeare, words | Comments Off on The Meaning of Words: Dystopias, Utopias and the Lingusitic

The Disconsolation of Mentality

In the following link, Killian C Quigley compares the narrative structure of Antic Hay to Barri J. Gold’s “The Consolation of Physics: Tennyson’s Thermodynamic Solution,” drawing parallels between the scientific paper and the literature techniques Huxley utilizes. Speculating on a different approach to Huxley’s work, Quigley begins a discussion on the relationship between scientific methodology […] Continue reading

Posted in Antic Hay, Barri J. Gold, Brain, Huxley, In Memoriam, Science and humanities, Tennyson, Thermodynamics | Comments Off on The Disconsolation of Mentality

“I want to be someone who believes”

Follow the link to read more about Erin Pellarin’s discussion of disillusionment and despair in relation to the ideals of the characters Gumbril, Gumbril Sr., and Lypiatt from Aldous Huxley’s first novel, Antic Hay. This blog post was written for the graduate course ENGL 335: Biocultures, a Seminar. “I want to be someone who believes”  […] Continue reading

Posted in Antic Hay, belief, disbelief, disillusionment, dystopia, Huxley, Religion, Religion and genetics | Comments Off on “I want to be someone who believes”

Huxley University: Become a Double Helix Today

The link below allows you to explore the Huxley University website and learn more about the institution that accepts students based on their DNA samples. The website was created by Eric Alderman and Mary Buzzard, and contains many references to novels that deal with the topic of genetics. Enjoy! http://huxleyedu.weebly.com/ Filed under: Class Projects, Novels, […] Continue reading

Posted in Class Projects, dystopia, genetics and literature, Huxley, Novels, Science and humanities | Comments Off on Huxley University: Become a Double Helix Today