Category Archives: literature

What Ones’ Slumber Can Do Others Perception

In Plate 12, line 5 (p. 101), why is Enitharmon’s eighteenth hundred-year-old slumber described as a “female dream”? William Blake’s, Europe: A Prophecy sets a tone into a different comprehension of how we can be able to view Blake’s literature. Within this section of his work, it doesn’t persuade us to be able to predict […] Continue reading

Posted in Design, feminism, Humanity, literature, society, The Flames of Orc (10/23), William Blake's reception | Comments Off on What Ones’ Slumber Can Do Others Perception

Accept God, But Don’t Be Deceived

Thomas Paine employed his literature that empowers a spark inside the English circles that his work has been either ridiculed or praised by readers for centuries. Contrary to popular belief, Paine was driven to express his admiration and faith in God, and just like a Newtonians, he avows the Deistic for the pursuit of happiness […] Continue reading

Posted in christianity, Earth, Empire vs. Revolution (10/16), Humanity, literature, Religion, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Accept God, But Don’t Be Deceived

Blake’s Retribution Towards Moravians

Through his work within The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, William Blake cryptically introduces his work through a theological manifesto. The passage is encoded to subliminally represent how Blake’s distaste for Moravian beliefs is due to his troubled understanding of how Heaven and Hell are set to be different from one another. Blake discovers a fluent […] Continue reading

Posted in Christ and the Body (10/2), christianity, Inspiration, life, literature, Religion, truth, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Blake’s Retribution Towards Moravians

Same Old, Same Old?

Throughout this course we have gone over the influential nature of literature movements on newer forms of media and how varied—but sometimes similar—themes are evoked through different mediums. Specifically, we have studied the effect of J.R.R. Tolkien’s work on the evolving media landscape. To credit Tolkien and his legendarium, it’s easy to say that his … Continue reading “Same Old, Same Old?” Continue reading

Posted in Fantasy, literature, Lovecraft, mythology, narrative, Opinion, speculative fiction, Tolkien, videogame | Comments Off on Same Old, Same Old?

The More I Learn, the Less I Know

Ross Koppel Dr. Garcia English 190 2 May 2018 I transferred to this institution after more than a few years as a part-time community college student. The transition was not easy, but I had the wonderful experience of taking almost exclusively classes in my field after becoming a full-time student. To condense what I have […] Continue reading

Posted in English, ethos, literature, Reflective Essay (5/2) | Comments Off on The More I Learn, the Less I Know

What A Long Strange Trip It’s Been

Daniel Lizaola Lopez Humberto Garcia English 190: Senior Thesis May 2, 2018 I wasn’t always an English major. I was lost in the vortex of societal norms and allowed the cosmology of my origin be originated by my environment. In high school, I was influenced by Ernesto “Che” Guevara and his passions. For the duration […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Earth, environment, essay, health, Humanity, life, literature, poetry, Reflective Essay (5/2), Self, society, system, teaching, truth, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on What A Long Strange Trip It’s Been

Reflective Essay: Ethical Conundrums in Flexible Narratives

My first English course at UC Merced was taught by Instructor Trevor Jackson, at the time I was still trying to fulfill the expectations my STEM oriented mentors expected from me, these expectations being to pursue a career in STEM. I was a disoriented Biology major, that realized I was so much happier and whole […] Continue reading

Posted in English Major, literature, Reflective Essay (5/2), UC Merced | Comments Off on Reflective Essay: Ethical Conundrums in Flexible Narratives

The Reason He Cries

Urizen is ultimately weeping about the same thing: the emergence of Los, or, revolution of the peoples through the ashes of long forgotten imaginations. His rule over the world is coming to an end, which is why in “Africa”, he “gave it into the hands of Newton & Locke” (110); “it“ being the ideology of reason. […] Continue reading

Posted in Africa, Asia, literature, Locke, Los, Newton, tears, Urizen, Urizen's Tears (3/21), William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on The Reason He Cries

The Pain of Will

Though William Blake is not anti-religious as Thomas Paine is, they both share a similar distaste for the church and state and how they operate (rule) society. In Thomas Paine’s “The Rights of Man Part 1”, he argues against the fallacy of his government: “what is government more than the management of the affairs of […] Continue reading

Posted in children, christianity, Empire vs. Revolution (2/28), Government, literature, poetry, politics, Religion, society, system, Thomas Paine, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on The Pain of Will

Filing for a divorce with hell.

Blakes touches on his idea of the poetic Genius again, in “Provers of Hell”; he claims that it is both a natural–not taught–kind of Genius, and that it isn’t necessarily the best looking process. Blake writes in lines 66-7: “Improvement makes strait roads, but the crooked roads without Improvement, are roads of Genius.” This goes […] Continue reading

Posted in Heaven and Hell, literature, Marriage of Heaven and Hell, Poetic Genius, Proverbs of Hell (2/14), teaching, William Blake, William Blake's reception | Comments Off on Filing for a divorce with hell.