Category Archives: Magnetosphere

The Northern Lights

The Northern Lights are a natural phenomenon that appear to be fresh out of a fantasy novel. Otherwise known as Aurora Borealis, these lights are the product of the Earth’s magnetic field and high energy particles from the sun. Normally our magnetic field is invisible, but in certain locations, like the Earth’s poles, they becomeContinue reading “The Northern Lights” Continue reading Continue reading

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What Causes the Northern Lights?

The aurora borealis, or aurora australis if in Southern Hemisphere, is one of nature’s most dazzling phenomena consisting of massive bands of colorful light streaking across the sky. This spectacular light show, despite its captivating beauty, actually portrays the deadly solar radiation spewing out from the sun and largely dissipating when coming into contact withContinue reading “What Causes the Northern Lights?” Continue reading Continue reading

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Blog 3: Auroras in the Southern United States

On November 20, 2003 Auroras were seen in the southern United States. This is not a normal occurrence as is likely obvious to most of you. Auroras, or the Northern Lights, are caused by charged particles from the sun spiraling around the earth’s magnetic field and hitting the atmosphere. The magnetic field lines of the … Continue reading Blog 3: Auroras in the Southern United States Continue reading Continue reading

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Earth’s Changing Magnetosphere

One of Earth’s most important features is its Magnetosphere.  This magnetic field that surrounds Earth deflects Solar wind that could slowly widdle away our atmosphere. Without an atmosphere, life would not have been able to develop on Earth.  In addition, if we were to suddenly lose our magnetosphere, then our power grids and other electronics […] Continue reading Continue reading

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Ganymede’s Ocean Confirmed?

Recent observations of Ganymede by Hubble appear to suggest that it may truly have an ocean far beneath its crust. Aurorae on the planet, caused by Ganymede’s magnetic field (the only moon in the solar system to have one), and their behavior seem to be suggestive of this high possibility. Ganymede’s distance from Jupiter allows […] Continue reading Continue reading

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An Ocean on a Moon?

One of the largest satellites in the solar system is Jupiter’s moon Ganymede. Though Ganymede is classified as a moon …

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What if Earth stopped spinning?

*Warning: rather long documentary!* I’ll sum up the documentary, but suggest you watch if you have time. In essence, a slowing Earth result in an orbit where the length of the day is equal to the entire year. Long exposure to the sun, and long exposure to space at night would result in extreme temperature […] Continue reading Continue reading

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Jupiter: Magnetosphere Explained

One feature of Jupiter that may come as a surprise is that it contains a magnetic field more than 20,000 times as strong as that of Earth’s. But, how is this possible if the Gas Giant is comprised of only … Continue reading Continue reading Continue reading

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