Category Archives: Margaret Atwood

Confessions of a Librarian’s Daughter

I can’t stand when people watch a movie before they read the book. There. I said it. Even back in fourth grade when a film adaptation of Jeff Kinney’s renowned Diary of a Wimpy Kid hit theaters, I was appalled by my young cohort watching in awe from front row seats, so mindless of the […] Continue reading

Posted in art, Atwood, dystopia, Fiction, Films, hulu, Margaret Atwood, Science Fiction, SF, sf movies, The Handmaid's Tale | Comments Off on Confessions of a Librarian’s Daughter

Alias Grace and the Present Past

On Friday, November 3, Netflix premiered Alias Grace, a six-part miniseries adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s 1996 novel of the same title. The pairing of the acclaimed novelist and a major streaming service was bound to generate much interest, not least owing to Netflix’s rival Hulu’s hugely successful small-screen iteration of Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale earlier this […] Continue reading

Posted in Alias Grace, Fiction, gender, Grace Marks, historical fiction, Margaret Atwood, NeoVictorian, Netflix, SF, speculative fiction, The Handmaid's Tale | Comments Off on Alias Grace and the Present Past

Evolving the Human Successor: Imperfect Perfection in Oryx and Crake

“These are floor models. They represent the art of the possible,” explains Crake to a skeptical Jimmy as Jimmy is introduced to the life-blood of the Paradice Project (Atwood 305). The Crakers are human-animal splices that have been created by Crak… Continue reading

Posted in adaptation, Atwood, Atwood, Margaret, Darwin, evolution, Idol, Margaret Atwood, Religion, Science Fiction, violence | Comments Off on Evolving the Human Successor: Imperfect Perfection in Oryx and Crake

Homo Sacer and the State of Exception in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake

~”The birth of the camp in our time appears as an event that decisively signals the political space of modernity itself”–Giorgio Agamben, Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life. In the introduction to Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power a… Continue reading

Posted in bare life, biopolitics, camp, Cary Wolfe, Giorgio Agamben, history of science, Homo Sacer, Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake, sovereignty | Comments Off on Homo Sacer and the State of Exception in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake

The Voice in His Head

One of the recurring features of Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake is the voice that keeps speaking in Snowman’s head, a voice whose tone is by turns condescending, instructional, pious, courageous, scolding, childish, and much else. The voice speak… Continue reading

Posted in Atwood, Margaret, biopolitics, Giorgio Agamben, Homo Sacer, language, Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake, Science Fiction, voice | Comments Off on The Voice in His Head

Thinking in “Speculative Fiction”

Children of Men: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9CFcTY_pik We began our discussion of Oryx and Crake with a background on the author, Margaret Atwood. Despite writing what most people would consider “science fiction,” Atwood, in many instances, has been known to correct this improper categorization of her works to speculative fiction[1]. Speculative fiction, as Atwood describes it, is fact within […] Continue reading

Posted in Children of Men, Ender's Game, Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake, Science and humanities, Science Fiction, speculative fiction | Comments Off on Thinking in “Speculative Fiction”

Genetic Modification as Creation?

One of the aspects of Oryx and Crake that has stuck out to me thus far in reading it is how Snowman deifies the titular characters.  He paints Oryx and Crake as the creators of the people that live around him in his post-apocalyptic world and says that he speaks to them, that he is their […] Continue reading

Posted in Creation, creation story, genetic engineering, God, Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake, playing God, post-apocalypse, Religion, Science and humanities | Comments Off on Genetic Modification as Creation?

“A Genuine Start-Over Skin”: The Erotics of World-Creation

Killain C. Quigley draws parallels between the erotic and the contagious in his blog post, explaining how the characteristic “Human carrier” of disease and outbreak novels signifies an erotic undertone. And this is eroticism that is not only in a sexual sense (though there’s plenty of that in Oryx and Crake), but an uncanny and […] Continue reading

Posted in contagion, contagious, disease emergence, epidemiology, erotics, Future, future of education, future of the university, humanities, Killian Quigley, libido, Margaret Atwood, myth, Oedipal complex, Oryx and Crake, outbreak, past, Priscilla Wald, psychoanalysis, Sander L. Gilman, Sharon Marcus, Sigmund Freud, utopia, world creation | Comments Off on “A Genuine Start-Over Skin”: The Erotics of World-Creation

Flotsam and Chaos: Things in Oryx and Crake

Materialism and its corporate grip on society is a rampant theme in Oryx and Crake, and it’s no surprise that Dan Fang would take a particular interest in it. In this post, she discusses the significance of Jimmy’s retained materialism; the previously mundane things that he owns are tangible remnants of an apocalyptic past. Fang […] Continue reading

Posted in Capitalism, commodity, genetic engineering, Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake, post-apocalyptic world, things | Comments Off on Flotsam and Chaos: Things in Oryx and Crake